Samsung SyncMaster T220 review: Samsung SyncMaster T220

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CNET Editors' Rating

3.5 stars Very good
  • Overall: 7.0
  • Design: 9.0
  • Features: 5.0
  • Performance: 7.0
  • Service and support: 7.0

Average User Rating

5 stars 1 user review
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good Smashing good looks; matte finish means less glare than with glossy screens.

The Bad A tad on the pricey side; merely average performance and feature set; wobbly stand.

The Bottom Line The Samsung T220 might be the most stylish LCD monitor we've seen, but average feature set and performance diminish its overall appeal. Despite its flashy looks, it's best used as a simple, productivity display.

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Is it possible to base an LCD purchase strictly on the display's bezel? If so, Samsung has an LCD to sell you. The Samsung SyncMaster T220 features the company's new Touch of Color bezel, which presents a most attractive visage. The black frame features slightly curved edges along the top and bottom, and a pleasing translucent strip of deep red runs along the bottom edge. The bezel is covered with a smooth, clear plastic coating, which extends past the display's black frame to create a narrow border around all four sides. Its design looks like that of an HDTV destined for the living room than a computer display, which makes it even more surprising to find only the most basic features onboard. The $299 Dell SP2208WFP costs less and provides an HDMI jack, USB ports, and a Webcam--all of which are absent on the T220. The SP2208WFP proved itself to be a better performer, too, though we found the Samsung T220 provides a more than adequate image overall. Samsung quotes a street price of $359 for the display, though it can be found for closer to $300 at the time of this writing. The Dell SP2208WFP remains our pick among 22-inch LCDs, but the Samsung T220 makes a strong case for those who want a great-looking monitor and can do with a thoroughly average feature set.

Design
The Samsung T220 has a similar shape to the Samsung 2232GW we looked at last month. The new Touch of Color bezel adds a clear plastic coating over the black bezel and subtle red highlights, which is most visible along the bottom edge and under the power button, in particular. The result is a striking look and one we prefer to the plain, glossy black design of the 2232GW or the Dell SP2208WFP's silver bezel.


The Samsung SyncMaster T220 presents a look of luxury despite its basic feature set and average performance.

Unfortunately, the T220 uses the same oval base as the 2232GW, which is prone to wobble and even more so in this case since the T220 sits up a bit higher than the 2232GW. If you bump your desk, the screen is sure to shake. The only physical adjustment the T220 affords is about 30 degrees of backward tilt.


The Touch of Color bezel shows off its touch of color most noticeably along the bottom edge.

Samsung hides all of the menu buttons along the right edge of the display; the only control on the front panel is a touch-sensitive power button (really, it's just an icon). The onscreen display is straightforward and easy to navigate. You can also adjust the brightness, switch between analog and digital inputs, and select among seven image presets--Custom, Text, Internet, Game, Sport, Movie, and Dynamic Contrast--without entering the OSD.

Manufacturer's specs:
Resolution: 1,680x1,050
Pixel-response rate: 2ms
Contrast ratio: 1,000:1
Connectivity: DVI, VGA
HDCP compliant? Yes
Included video cables? DVI, VGA

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Where to Buy

Samsung SyncMaster T220

Part Number: LS22TWHSUV/ZA Released: May. 9, 2008

Pricing is currently unavailable.

Quick Specifications See All

  • Release date May. 9, 2008
  • Display Type LCD monitor / TFT active matrix
  • Interface VGA (HD-15)
  • Diagonal Size 22 in
  • Pixel Pitch 0.282 mm
  • Image Contrast Ratio 1000:1
  • Image Aspect Ratio 16:10
About The Author

Matt Elliott, a technology writer for more than a decade, is a PC tester, Mac user, and amateur photographer based in New Hampshire.