Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 Book Cover Case review: Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 Book Cover Case

The tablet snaps into the bottom cover, first along the bottom and then at the top, securing it snugly in. The lower-right corner remains uncovered, keeping the tablet's built-in stylus holder clear. At the top edge is a hole for the headphone jack, and on the bottom edge are two 2-inch-long rubber bumpers on the right and left sides. The tablet can easily be removed from the case by pushing back on the plastic clamps on the top two corners. While it closes fine, it would close even better if there were some kind of lock for the front flap. Right now it feels a bit flimsily closed.

On the back cover is an opening for both the 5-megapixel camera and LED flash. That's great, but when you fold the front flap back (something you have to do to uncover the screen) the camera is then covered by the front flap, defeating the purpose of the flap in the first place.

The back cover features an opening for the 5-megapixel camera. If only the front cover featured an opening as well. Josh Miller/CNET

The cover has two different stand features, one that angles the tablet at about 30 degrees, which works perfectly for typing, and the other, made for movie-watching, sits at about 75 degrees. For the 30-degree angle, the front flap folds back and the smallest section magnetically attaches to the back of the case, creating an assuredly stable typing angle. Unfortunately, from this angle, the top-edge buttons (including the power) are partially covered by the back flap; the dock connector on the bottom can still be accessed easily. Also, from this position is a space over the headphone jack where the stylus can rest vertically, evoking a crude pen stand.

The movie-viewing angle is a bit precarious. Josh Miller/CNET

The movie-viewing angle isn't as easily configured: the first segment of the front flap is folded back and sits flush along the back cover with the second segment angled out toward the desktop. The smallest segment is folded toward the tablet with the soft felt side on the desktop. While fairly stable, this position feels a bit precarious, and any moderately strong knocks can quickly destabilize it. Unfortunately, from this position, the dock connector can't be accessed.

Conclusion
While the tablet doesn't auto sleep when the screen is covered, even when Smart Stay is turned on (a feature I've been spoiled by on Apple's Smart Cover for the iPad), my biggest gripe is the price. The cover retails for $49.99 and while this is indeed a well-made case, with some good features and a design that takes the S Pen stylus into account, unless you're burning a hole through your pockets with your phat cash rolls, it's simply not worth a price that high.

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