Samsung CLP-315W review: Samsung CLP-315W

CNET Editors' Rating

2.5 stars OK
  • Overall: 5.3
  • Design: 7.0
  • Features: 5.0
  • Performance: 4.0
  • Service and support: 5.0

Average User Rating

5 stars 1 user review
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good Small footprint; lightweight; sleek design; individual toner cartridges.

The Bad Poor quality prints; slow output; lacks dedicated cancel button; no manual feed tray; higher cost per page than average; low duty cycle.

The Bottom Line The Samsung CLP-315W is a fancy looking wireless laser printer with a clean design and small footprint, but the output quality is unacceptable and the blisteringly slow speeds will have you searching for other options

Editors' Top Picks

The Samsung CLP-315W is a full color laser printer with built-in wireless connectivity that makes it easy to link several computers to the printer over a network. The compact CLP-315 series is one of the smallest in its class and the individual toner cartridges save money by giving you the option of replacing each one separately. Although the printer is well-designed, it loses its momentum in print speed and quality. Our test results show that the CLP-315W is as almost twice as slow as the average color laser and output quality is nowhere near acceptable. Priced at $250, the CLP-315W is too much money to put into a machine that can't deliver decent-quality prints.

Design and features
Unlike flashier Samsung printers such as the Samsung ML-1630, this one's design is very straightforward. The majority of the chassis is a dark piano black with touches of glossy plastic trim around the perimeter. The printer sits in at 15.3 inches wide by 12.3 inches deep by 9.6 inches tall and only weighs 24.3 pounds, so it's surprisingly compact compared with other color lasers. For example, the Dell 1320c is double the size and weight of the Samsung and has no built-in wireless print server.

The top of the Samsung printer is just as simple as the chassis, with a single power button and several LED lights to indicate a wireless connection and notify you about paper jams and toner shortages. The control panel annoyingly lacks a dedicated cancel button, so if you want to stop a job in mid-queue, you have to do it manually through the operating system. The top of the unit also has a foldout arm to catch paper on its way out of the feeder. A removable paper tray lives on the bottom of the CLP-315W and can hold the standard 150 sheets of paper in a variety of sizes up to 8.5 inches by 14 inches. Unfortunately, there's no manual feed slot that you commonly see in single function laser printers, but you can use the main input tray for different kinds of irregular media including envelopes, card stock, and transparency papers.

The CLP-315W uses four toner cartridges (three colors and one black) hidden behind a drop-down panel on the front faceplate. The cartridges are lightweight and easy to remove and replace using the color-coded tabs. Each cartridge only comes in one capacity (1,000 pages) and can be purchased through a variety of channels for about $40. Since the black and color cartridges cost the same, we can estimate that each page will cost about 4 cents to print, slightly more expensive than the Dell 1320c. The Samsung is also limited by the number of pages it can print per month. The CLP-315W's duty cycle number is 20,000 pages. Small businesses and workgroups with a high volume of monthly prints might be better suited for other printers such as the Brother HL-4040CN that can handle 35,000 pages per month.

Editors' Top Picks

 

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Quick Specifications See All

  • Interface Ethernet 10/100Base-TX
  • Connectivity Technology wireless
  • Printer Type Workgroup printer - laser - color
  • Max Resolution ( Color ) 2400 x 600 dpi
  • Max Speed 16 ppm
    17 ppm
    4 ppm
    4 ppm
About The Author

Justin Yu covers headphones and peripherals for CNET. When he's not wading through Web gulch or challenging colleagues to typing tests, you can find him making fun of technology with Jeff Bakalar every afternoon on The 404 show.