Rickshaw Waterproof X-Pac small commuter bag (red) review: Rickshaw Waterproof X-Pac small commuter bag (red)

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3

CNET Editors' Rating

4 stars Excellent
  • Overall: 8.0
  • Design: 8.0
  • Features: 8.0
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good Layers of thick waterproof protection; solid build; variety of colors/designs.

The Bad Bulky feel; expensive for a laptop bag.

The Bottom Line Rickshaw Bagworks' X-Pac waterproof bag offers weatherproof protection for laptops, but its bulky design and flaunty colors aren't for those who want something more everyday.

Editors' Top Picks

When does a feature become a hassle? When referring to laptop safety versus portability, that's a very good and vexing question. Rickshaw Bagworks, a San Francisco-based company focusing on a high-end line of laptop-carrying messenger bags that use a fair amount of recycled materials, made us wonder about that when testing several of its products. Its Waterproof X-Pac commuter bag ($160) is a case that will withstand downpours or puddles, but it's not exactly the most svelte of computer bags.

A top flap made of waterproof technical sailcloth is, as Rickshaw itself proclaims, lightweight. The rest of the bag, however, feels heavy. Inner waterproof linings on all bag walls make the X-Pac feel very safe, but it also feels as if you're carrying a foldable raincoat over your shoulder. Two zippable outer pockets have a pleasant rubberized padding that's also lined, and inside all of this is an additional, thickly padded (and removable by Velcro) laptop sleeve. Yes, that's a lot of waterproof layering, but perhaps with valuable devices, it's better to be safe than sorry.

Editors' Top Picks

 

ARTICLE DISCUSSION

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Where to Buy

Rickshaw Waterproof X-Pac small commuter bag (red)

Part Number: 182222402

This product is available directly from the manufacturer's Web site.

About The Author

Scott Stein is a senior editor covering iOS and laptop reviews, mobile computing, video games, and tech culture. He has previously written for both mainstream and technology enthusiast publications including Wired, Esquire.com, Men's Journal, and Maxim, and regularly appears on TV and radio talking tech trends.