Proxim Symphony HomeRF base station review: Proxim Symphony HomeRF base station

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CNET Editors' Rating

3.5 stars Very good
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good Inexpensive; simple setup; backward compatible with first-generation HomeRF; good support policies.

The Bad Limited configuration options.

The Bottom Line The Proxim base station offers ample wireless connectivity at a low price for those who simply want to share an Internet connection.

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Is the simplest solution always the best? The Proxim Symphony HomeRF base station lets you share an Internet connection wirelessly in your home, and it is among the easiest solutions to install and configure. It's also one of the least expensive Internet-sharing devices currently available. But this base station's simplicity comes with some limitations. And although it offers adequate bandwidth for basic broadband sharing, an 802.11b solution would give you greater maximum throughput. Is the simplest solution always the best? The Proxim Symphony HomeRF base station lets you share an Internet connection wirelessly in your home, and it is among the easiest solutions to install and configure. It's also one of the least expensive Internet-sharing devices currently available. But this base station's simplicity comes with some limitations. And although it offers adequate bandwidth for basic broadband sharing, an 802.11b solution would give you greater maximum throughput.

New HomeRF measures up
The Proxim Symphony base station is one of the first products based on the new HomeRF 2.0 specification. It is backward compatible with earlier HomeRF products and increases the technology's maximum connection speed to 10Mbps. This boost in bandwidth catapults HomeRF into the same league as 802.11b solutions. But while HomeRF may now be better equipped to handle voice and streaming-media transmissions, its adoption rate still lags behind that of the more popular 802.11b. This is a big deal since business users may want to connect at work or on the road, as well as at home. And because HomeRF and 802.11b are not compatible, you need to make a clear decision between one technology or the other.

Small and simple
The $200 Proxim Symphony is a little bigger than a deck of cards and small enough to sit unobtrusively on a flat surface, such as the top of most broadband modems. It has three status lights on its top panel to indicate power, Ethernet activity, and wireless activity. Two auto-sensing 10/100 Ethernet ports on its back panel let you connect to a standard DSL/cable modem; you can also hook up to an uplink port on a hub or switch using the supplied Ethernet cable. The quick-start guide runs through basic hardware and software installation, but for more in-depth information, refer to the user manual. There you'll find a general section on wireless networking, detailed configuration and operating instructions, and a basic troubleshooting section.

To communicate with the base station, each computer you want to network must be equipped with a HomeRF wireless adapter. The base station is compatible with Proxim's first-generation Symphony HRF devices (based on the HomeRF 1.2 standard) but not its original family of Symphony cordless products based on the OpenAir standard. And remember, if you plan to use the base station with the Symphony HRF devices, you'll have to make do with their slower 1.6Mbps maximum throughput speed. To get higher bandwidth, the base station needs to communicate with an adapter based on the new HomeRF 2.0 specification. Theoretically, the base station is compatible with other companies' HomeRF products. However, because the base station uses a proprietary configuration tool, using it with products from other vendors could be tricky. You would need to download and run the Symphony software to make any advanced configuration changes on the base station, such as fiddling with network address translation (NAT), DHCP, or PPPoE or changing IP address information.

Maestro, if you please...
You can configure the Proxim Symphony HomeRF base station and check its status remotely with the help of Proxim's Maestro configuration utility, the same utility you use to manage your Symphony USB or PC Card adapters. This simplifies installation because you don't need to install an additional configuration utility; you just use the software you already loaded onto your system to install the adapters. At the same time, however, it locks you in to Proxim's Symphony product line because you need the Maestro configuration utility to configure the base station. The Maestro program has all the right administrative features, letting you monitor network activity and signal strength, change network settings, upgrade the unit's firmware, and more. Still, we prefer browser-based configuration tools, such as the one that comes with Proxim's Skyline 802.11b wireless broadband gateway, because of the greater flexibility they offer. With a browser-based configuration utility, there's no additional software to install, and it can be easily accessed from any system connected to the network.

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Where to Buy

Proxim Symphony HomeRF base station

Part Number: 494005

MSRP: $199.99

See manufacturer website for availability.

Quick Specifications See All

  • Data Transfer Rate 10 Mbps
  • Data Link Protocol HomeRF
  • Type none
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