Patriot Warp V.2 review: Patriot Warp V.2

We tested the Patriot Warp V.2 using the same structures set up for the Intel X-25M SSD: We installed it on the same Dell Inspiron E1505 laptop and copied the same 10GB folder that we use for all of our hard-drive tests into another folder on the same drive. We also ran our standard laptop battery test and recorded the total boot-up time from power on to the appearance of the Windows cursor arrow. For a comparison test, we used the Intel X-25M as well as two different laptop hard drives: a 7,200rpm, 200GB Seagate Momentus and a 5,400rpm, 250GB Fujitsu disk.

Transfer speed (Megabits per second)
(Longer bars indicate better performance)

Battery drain (in minutes)
(Longer bars indicate better performance)

Boot time (in seconds)
(Shorter bars indicate better performance)

Although we didn't expect the Patriot to outperform the Intel X-25M in any of the tests, we were somewhat surprised to see that it fell dead last in two out of three. The only test on which it showed a benefit was the transfer speed benchmark. The Patriot delivers on its promise to access data quicker than the standard 5,400rpm Fujitsu drive, but still can't quite keep up with the 7,200rpm Seagate Momentus, even though the difference is far from severe. The Intel SSD remains the champ, at an impressive 242 megabits per second, but does so at $8.75 per gigabyte.

In our battery drain test, the Patriot drive lasted the least amount of time, shutting off at the 86-minute mark. The Seagate Momentus didn't hold out much longer, most likely because of the effort exerted in spinning the drive at 7,200 rotations per minute. Surprisingly, the Fujitsu hard disk ran the longest, at 113 minutes--a full 10 minutes longer than the second place, $700 Intel SSD. Finally, the Patriot took its time in our boot-speed test, dragging its feet to take 35 seconds to complete loading the operating system. Coincidentally, both hard drives spent 32 seconds booting up, but of course the X-25M crushed the competition in just 26 seconds.

Taking a look at the Patriot drive's final performance scores only boosts our recommendation to save up and buy the Intel X-25M solid-state drive if you're consumed with performance and money is no object. Granted, we haven't had the chance to test other SSDs, but if the Patriot is an indicator of non-Intel solid-states, then the industry still has a long way to go before it can deliver on its initial promise. On a consumer level, you'll see your money go much further with a high-level 7,200rpm laptop hard drive.

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    Patriot Warp V.2 (128GB)

    Part Number: PE128GS25SSDR

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    Quick Specifications See All

    • Form Factor 2.5"
    • Hard Drive Type internal hard drive
    • Interface Type Serial ATA-300
    • Capacity 128 GB
    About The Author

    Justin Yu covers headphones and peripherals for CNET. When he's not wading through Web gulch or challenging colleagues to typing tests, you can find him making fun of technology with Jeff Bakalar every afternoon on The 404 show.