Panasonic DMR-E55 review: Panasonic DMR-E55

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CNET Editors' Rating

3 stars Good
  • Overall: 6.2
  • Design: 5.0
  • Features: 7.0
  • Performance: 7.0
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good Relatively inexpensive; excellent recording quality in XP and SP modes; simultaneous recording and playback with DVD-RAM; Flexible Recording mode.

The Bad Somewhat difficult to use; no IR blaster for cable box control; soft recording quality in EP mode; no FireWire input.

The Bottom Line Panasonic's least-expensive DVD recorder is a good choice for basic TV and video archiving.

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Intro

Now that DVD recorders have reached the brink of mass affordability, everyone is starting to make one. Panasonic was on the scene before just about everyone, however, and its entry-level fifth-generation model--the DMR-E55S--delivers some refinements that set it apart from the Gateways and Lite-Ons of the world. First on the list: DVD-RAM allows the E55S to perform DVR-like tricks, such as pausing live TV. If you don't need this kind of functionality, if you already own a DVR, or if you find it hard to program a VCR, you should probably go for a different deck. If, on the other hand, you want the most features for your buck, the Panasonic DMR-E55S is a winner.

Editor's note: We have changed the rating in this review to reflect recent changes in our rating scale. Click here to find out more.

The Panasonic DMR-E55S stands taller than almost every regular DVD player out there, and its chunky-looking face is less stylish than most. Its central, animated display is well organized, especially the recording information: one glance at the cool-looking spinning-disc icon gives you the status. By the way, if you don't like its silver case, you can opt for the black DMR-E55K instead.

Unlike some players we've seen, the DMR-E55S doesn't make recording dummy-proof. There's no dedicated recording menu like the one we saw on the the Lite-On LVW-5005 , so we found ourselves sometimes making basic mistakes--such as recording via the wrong input. Beginners may have to resort to the dense manual to get started on a recording. Bottom line: If the intended user finds operating a VCR difficult, the DMR-E55S isn't for him or her.

In its favor, Panasonic has added a sort of metamenu to make things a bit easier. Pressing the cryptic Function button with a home-brewed DVD in the tray brings up an onscreen display that leads to options such as Direct Navigator, a menu of thumbnails that correspond to different recordings on a disc; Timer Recording, for setting up timers or entering VCR Plus numbers; Flexible Recording (see Features); and Player and Disc Setup menus. Also new for this year's model, finalized discs have a top menu that includes thumbnail icons for each program.

The remote is cluttered with buttons below the cursor control that allow direct access to the more advanced functions, but most users will prefer to use the onscreen menus. The medium-size clicker is otherwise easy to use.

As we mentioned in the intro, the DVD-RAM format gives the Panasonic DMR-E55S some of the functionality of a hard-disk recorder such as TiVo--although, unlike its sibling the DMR-E85HS, it does not contain a hard disk. While a DVD-RAM recording is in progress on the DMR-E55S, you can watch it from the beginning or play back something else. Basic editing, such as shortening segments (read: removing commercials) and dividing one program into two, is also available, although you're better off performing advanced video editing on a PC.

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Where to Buy

Panasonic DMR-E55S

Part Number: DMRE55S Released: Jun. 1, 2004

MSRP: $249.95

See manufacturer website for availability.

Quick Specifications See All

  • Release date Jun. 1, 2004
  • Type DVD recorder
About The Author

Section Editor David Katzmaier has reviewed TVs at CNET since 2002. He is an ISF certified, NIST trained calibrator and developed CNET's TV test procedure himself. Previously David wrote reviews and features for Sound & Vision magazine and eTown.com.