Cambridge SoundWorks Oontz Curve Bluetooth speaker review: A wireless speaker that's a relative bargain at $30

Other speakers in this category include the Divoom Bluetune-Solo , which has both an audio input and an audio output, so it can double as a Bluetooth transceiver for your home stereo (the Oontz Curve has an audio input and comes with a cable for connecting non-Bluetooth devices). There's also the JBL Micro Wireless and HMDX Jam Plus , which is a little bigger than the Curve but similar in shape. They all sound very similar. Of the three, I like the design of the JBL Micro Wireless, but it does cost $60. The Divoom and HMDX units cost less, but they'll still run you $10 or $20 more than the Curve.

Battery life is rated at 5 hours, which is only OK, though you can do better if you play your music at lower volumes. The speaker charges via Micro-USB (a cable is supplied).

The top of the speaker, which has a call answer/end button when in speakerphone mode. Sarah Tew/CNET

A carrying pouch is not included. That would have been a nice addition considering that if you want to preserve the shiny finish -- yes, it does show fingerprints -- you'll probably need to protect it when you stick the speaker in a bag with other items that might scratch it.

Conclusion
Don't me wrong, while I sound a little critical of the Curve, I think it's a decent deal. It isn't considerably better than the rest of the tiny budget speakers out there, but you're not going to do too much better for $30. Just don't come in expecting to get incredible sound for that money and you should be happy with the Curve.

As far as accessories go, you get a Micro-USB cable and an audio cable for non-Bluetooth devices, but no protective carrying pouch.

Editors' Top PicksSee All

 

Discuss Oontz Curve by Cambridge SoundWorks (Titanium Black)

Conversation powered by Livefyre