OCZ Vector 150 review: Fast, good-looking SSD, but not new

The drive's package includes the SSD itself, a desktop bracket to make it easily fit inside a desktop computer, and a serial number for a retail copy of Acronis True Image 2013, which is one of the best backup and drive-cloning software for Windows. You can download this software and use the key to activate it.

Cost per gigabyte
The Vector 150 is available in 120GB, 240GB, and 480GB versions, which at launch are slated to cost $129.99, $239.99, and $499.99, respectively. The drive costs just a few cents more than a dollar per gigabyte; that's about how much the original Vector cost when it launched. But the Vector came out a year ago; with a smaller memory capacity, I was hopping that the Vector 150 would be more affordable.

For now, the Vector 150 is among the most expensive SSDs on the market. The Samsung 840 Evo, for example, only costs between 60 cents and 80 cents per gigabyte.

Cost per gigabyte

Performance
The Vector 150 was fast in my testing, but it didn't really outdo its predecessor. In fact it was slower than the Vector in most tests.

In sequential copy tests, the new drive offered a sustained speed of 265MBps for writing and 201MBps for reading. In the same tests the Vector scored 287MBps and 278MBps, respectively. In the combined test where the drive performed both writing and reading simultaneously, the Vector 150 scored 231MBps, compared with the Vector's 243MBps. Since the Vector was one of the fastest SSDs I've seen, the Vector 150 was still average among high-end SSDs. It just doesn't outdo its older brother.

CNET Labs' data transfer scores (in megabytes per second)
(Longer bars indicate better performance)
As secondary drive (read only)  
As secondary drive (write only)  
As OS drive (read and write)  
Samsung 840 Evo (Rapid)
193.32 
289.32 
378.44 
Samsung 840 Evo
184.45 
266.9 
257.13 
OCZ Vector
277.84 
286.77 
243.01 
Plextor M5 Pro Xtreme
270.8 
269.78 
236.18 
OCZ Vector 150
200.46 
265.32 
231.42 
SanDisk Extreme II
203.42 
255.86 
224.27 
Seagate 600 SSD
275.21 
259.01 
192.26 
Transcend SSD720
269.55 
230.58 
145.26 
Seagate Laptop Thin SSHD
84.75 
39.61 
10.57 

In simulation tests using PC Mark 8 benchmark software, where the entire system was tested to see how the SSD helped improve the performance, the Vector 150 did very well, topping the charts in both Home and Work simulated workloads.

PC Mark 8 scores
(Longer bars indicate better performance)
Storage score  
Work score  
Home score  
OCZ Vector 150
4,948 
4,909 
3,437 
Samsung 840 Evo (Rapid)
4,990 
4,605 
3,324 
Samsung 840 Evo
4,967 
4,665 
3,339 
OCZ Vector
4,958 
4,646 
3,327 
Plextor M5 Pro Xtreme
4,948 
4,658 
3,331 
SanDisk Extreme II
4,938 
4,680 
3,306 
Seagate 600 SSD
4,896 
4,621 
3,296 
Transcend SSD720
4,779 
4,658 
3,328 
Seagate Laptop Thin SSHD
2,512 
4,585 
3,251 

Other than that, the Vector 150 worked well throughout my testing process and worked with both Windows and Mac computers without any problems. Compared with a hard drive, it indeed showed significant improvement in system performance. The test machine took a very short time to boot up and resume from sleep mode, and all applications launched much faster.

Conclusion
Overall, the Vector 150 is a winner in terms of performance, design, and warranty. The drive will make a great upgrade for a computer that's currently using a regular hard drive as its main storage device.

However, compared with the original Vector drive, the Vector 150 is not a worthwhile upgrade since it offers about the same (slightly slower, in fact) performance with no other benefits. And among high-end SSDs on the market, it's one of the most expensive, for now.

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Quick Specifications See All

  • Release date Nov 7, 2013
  • Form Factor 2.5" Ultra Slim Line
  • Hard Drive Type internal hard drive
  • Capacity 120 GB