Nintendo 2DS review:

Nintendo's portable gaming machine is a better deal than ever

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Is this a good deal?

At $80, it's tough to argue against the purchase of a 2DS, if only for the huge library of 3DS games it opens the door to. Between the gamut of releases already available on the platform and all of the software available in the Nintendo Online Store, you'll never run out of things to play.

At the same time, the 2DS isn't likely to get many new blockbuster releases down the road. It feels like that door is all but closed. But for $80, access to this rich, established legacy of great exclusive games that you can't play (yet) on your smartphone or tablet -- the Marios, Zeldas, Donkey Kongs and Star Foxes -- is where the value is. And, ultimately, that's what you're paying for.

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Who is this good for?

Of course, anyone can have fun with the 2DS, but I really think it's the perfect intro piece of hardware for a younger player. Older gamers might be disappointed with the 2DS' small screens -- especially compared to the flagship New 3DS XL.

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Should I get one?

Teens or adults who like Nintendo games should still opt for the New Nintendo 3DS XL. That model provides the best overall mobile experience, thanks to its improved screen and head-tracking (the 3D effect looks better than it did on the older 3DS models). However, the best will also cost you more: that model goes for $199, £165 or AU$249.

But for kids under 10, it's tough to beat the price and value of the 2DS. And the included Mario Kart 7 game is like a cherry on top. Just be sure to invest in a padded case (widely available for under $10).

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