Nikon Coolpix S570 review: Nikon Coolpix S570

Performance for the S570 is average for its class teetering on the edge of slow. It takes two seconds to wake up and shoot. Subsequent shots will leave you waiting an average of 2.2 seconds between them, jumping to 3.8 seconds if you use the flash. Shutter lag is noticeable in good lighting conditions at 0.6 second; in dim lighting, it's a bit better at 0.8 second. The S570 has a full-resolution continuous shooting speed of 0.6 frames per second. These numbers really drive home that this camera is better for still subjects than moving targets.

Overall, the S570 produces very good photo quality. Many cameras in its class suffer a significant dip in quality when they use any sensitivity above ISO 200. The S570 is actually good to ISO 400 and to some extent ISO 800. The camera lets you limit the auto ISO range to either 80-400 or 80-800. If you're in daylight or bright conditions, I recommend locking it down to 80-400. Again, it did perform well up to ISO 800 with minimal color shift and most fine detail intact, but it's at its best below ISO 400. It can shoot at full resolution up to and including a sensitivity of ISO 3,200. However, both it and ISO 1,600 don't look good because of color shifting and yellow blotching. So while you can keep shooting photos in low-light conditions, you probably won't be thrilled by the results.

Colors are not accurate from the S570, but the results are pleasing. Everything turned out nice, bright, and reasonably natural-looking. Typical of compact cameras, highlights tend to blow out, but at least Nikon's D-Lighting system helps bring up shadow detail. For a 28mm-equivalent wide-angle lens, the S570 has little in the way of barrel distortion and has no discernible pincushion distortion when the lens is fully extended. In high-contrast areas of photos there is some purple fringing, but the amounts are below average for its class. Lastly, photos generally looked a tad soft. The softness was consistent from edge to edge, though, unlike models we've tested that soft off to the sides or in the corners.

There are a lot of cameras competing in the $100 to $200 price range. Some cameras compensate for their mediocre photo quality and performance by loading up on features. The Coolpix S570 comes close to falling in that category, but it seems that Nikon put more effort than usual into the results. It's not excellent, but for someone looking for a reasonably priced ultracompact camera for portrait and landscape shots where speedy performance is less of an issue, the S570 should work nicely.

Shooting speed (in seconds)
(Longer bars indicate better performance)
Time to first shot  
Typical shot-to-shot time (flash)  
Typical shot-to-shot time  
Shutter lag (dim)  
Shutter lag (typical)  
Canon PowerShot SD1200 IS
1.4 
3.2 
2.1 
0.7 
0.5 
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W220
1.6 
2.7 
1.7 
0.7 
0.5 
Nikon Coolpix S570
2 
3.8 
2.2 
0.8 
0.6 
Kodak EasyShare M1093 IS
2.8 
1.4 
1.2 
1 
0.5 
Pentax Optio P70
2.5 
4 
3.9 
1 
0.5 

Typical continuous-shooting speed (in frames per second)
(Longer bars indicate better performance)

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Where to Buy

MSRP: $179.95

See manufacturer website for availability.

Quick Specifications See All

  • Digital camera type Ultracompact
  • Optical Zoom 5 x
  • Optical Sensor Type CCD
  • Sensor Resolution 12.0 Megapixel
  • Image Stabilizer electronic
  • Optical Sensor Size 1/2.3"
About The Author

Joshua Goldman is a senior editor for CNET Reviews, covering cameras, camcorders, and related accessories. He has been writing about and reviewing consumer technology and software since 2000.