NetGear N600 Wireless Dual Band Router WNDR3400 review: NetGear N600 Wireless Dual Band Router WNDR3400

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CNET Editors' Rating

4 stars Excellent
  • Overall: 8.0
  • Design and ease of use: 7.0
  • Features: 8.0
  • Performance: 9.0
  • Service and support: 8.0

Average User Rating

2 stars 22 user reviews
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good The Netgear N600 Wireless Dual Band Router WNDR3400 supports true dual-band and offers fast wireless performance and long range. It has a useful set of networking features, such as Guest zone, network storage, traffic meter, and USB external hard-drive support for network storage. Also, it's aesthetically pleasing and affordable and comes with an intuitive Web interface.

The Bad The Netgear N600 Wireless Dual Band Router WNDR3400 doesn't offer Gigabit Ethernet and its network storage performance could be better.

The Bottom Line The Netgear N600 Wireless Dual Band Router WNDR3400 is a great dual-band router for any home at an affordable price. Its lack of Gigabit Ethernet might steer enthusiasts away, however.

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It's a bit hard to categorize the Netgear N600 Wireless Dual Band Router WNDR3400. On one hand it has the stellar performance and features of a high-end wireless router; on the other, it doesn't support Gigabit Ethernet, a lack that is only found in budget low-end routers. At the street price of just around $80, however, this is a great deal nonetheless.

The WNDR3400 offers all-around great wireless performance on both the 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands with excellent range, especially on the 2.4GHz band. Apart from the lack of Gigabit Ethernet, the only other complaint we have is the network storage throughput speed, which is mediocre. However, this is common among routers with the same features.

If you're looking for a well-rounded wireless router for your home and don't want to spend much, the WNDR3400 is worth every penny.

Design and setup
The N600 Wireless Dual Band Router WNDR3400 router looks much like a member of Netgear's RangeMax family of routers and access points. On top, right in the middle of the sleek black surface, it has a big, round blue button adorned with eight little LED lights that supposedly represent the directions in which the antennas are directed. Like most Netgear routers and access points, the WNDR3400 has an internal antenna design, making it more compact and tidier than routers with external antennas. This big blue button is also dubbed the Wi-Fi Protected Setup button. Press it and you will start a 2-minute window of time in which other WPS-enabled devices can enter the network.

On the back, the router has four LAN ports (for wired clients) and one WAN port (to be connected to an Internet source such as a broadband modem). These ports, unfortunately, are all regular 10/100Mbps Ethernet. Near the ports are the Wi-Fi on/off switch and a USB 2.0 port to host an external hard drive for the router's network storage feature.

On the front, the WNDR3400 has an array of LED lights that show the status of the network ports, the connection to the Internet, the USB port, and so on. The router has two detachable feet that enable it to work in the vertical position.

The router comes with a setup application called Netgear Genie that includes detailed step-by-step instructions. The instructions are so clear that we believe few would have trouble getting the router up and running. We were able to do so within 5 minutes, including the time spent getting the router out of the box. Note, however, this is an early version of Netgear Genie. During CES 2011, Netgear announced a much more advanced version of the software that can do a lot more than just help set up the device.

Features
The WNDR3400 is the second true dual-band router we've reviewed from Netgear, following the WNDR3700. This means it's capable of simultaneously broadcasting Wireless-N signals on both the 2.4GHz and 5GHz frequencies. The 2.4GHz is the popular wireless band shared with other home devices such as cordless phones and Bluetooth headsets. The 5GHz band is somewhat more exclusive and therefore should offer better throughput performance. By being dual-band, the WNDR3400 supports virtually all existing network clients.

Netgear offers another dual-band router, the WNDR3300, which can work in only one band at a time. In that sense, the WNDR3400 is a big upgrade.

Like the WNDR3700, out of the box, the WNDR3400 has two wireless networks, one for each band. You can turn these networks on or off separately by using the router's Web interface. Apart from these, the router offers the option of another two guest networks--one for each band--which can also be turned on or off separately. A guest network is useful if you want to offer free Internet access to guests while keeping them from accessing your local resources such as your printer or personal files. This is a great feature for a small cafe or restaurant.

Again, like the WNDR3700, the WNDR3400 comes with an NAS function that requires an external USB hard drive (not included) to work. We tried it with a few external hard drives and were pleased with how this feature worked, though we wished it were faster. The router supports hard drives formatted in both NTFS and FAT32 file systems. This means you can just plug in your current external hard drive with data already on it and share it with the rest of the network. The router can also power compact hard drives that are USB bus-powered. The router manages its storage via Netgear's ReadyShare feature, which is also used for the company's NAS servers. The router supports Windows' SMB protocol, which allows any computer in the network to access its storage using a network browser (such as Windows Explorer) without having any additional software installed. It also supports Macs and the shares will automatically appear in Finder.

The router's only means of restricting access to its storage is via password. For example, you can set a password for read-only access and another for read/write access to a particular folder on the external hard drive. Once set, the restriction is applied to anyone wanting to access that folder. This is a primitive but effective way to manage network storage. Most NAS servers use more advanced restriction protocols via user accounts. However, considering the fact that this is primarily a router, we were happy with this level of restriction.

The router's NAS feature can also handle other NAS functions such as FTP and HTTP. You can also set up remote connections to access the data via Internet. To do this, however, you will need to use a dynamic DNS service, such as Dyndns.org, unless your connection to the Internet has a static IP address.

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Quick Specifications See All

  • Remote Management Protocol HTTP
  • Connectivity Technology wireless
  • Weight 1.1 lbs
About The Author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews networking and storage products, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.