MoodLogic 2.0 review: MoodLogic 2.0

  • 1

CNET Editors' Rating

3.5 stars Very good
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good Quickly creates playlists from activated songs; lets you profile your own music and earn more song credits; standardizes and corrects song titles and artist names; attractive interface and simple installation.

The Bad Song database is currently limited and infrequently updated; slow activation process; somewhat expensive; doesn't store personal ratings on a server for later retrieval; slow technical support; iffy integration with MP3 players.

The Bottom Line MoodLogic ingeniously organizes digital music, and we like its ability to correct and standardize song, artist, and album names. But it's too soon to shell out $29.95; try the free version and wait for future releases.

Don't Miss



MoodLogic 2.0 bills itself as a music companion--an appropriately vague phrase since this service defies easy definition. (Download MoodLogic here.) It's an online music database, organizer, and playlist generator that catalogs music files; corrects ID3 tags, song titles, and album and artist names; organizes music; and lets you profile your own songs and contribute to the MoodLogic database. It's also a virtual DJ: you tell the program what music genre or tempo you're in the mood to hear, and MoodLogic serves up the tunes to match--from your own collection, of course. We love its organization and title-correction features, but we found that MoodLogic's database lacks depth. The service has some rough edges, and it's a bit pricey at $39.95, though it's currently on sale for $29.95. Wait for future releases, though, and give the free version a try--if only because there's nothing else like it.

MoodLogic 2.0 bills itself as a music companion--an appropriately vague phrase since this service defies easy definition. (Download MoodLogic here.) It's an online music database, organizer, and playlist generator that catalogs music files; corrects ID3 tags, song titles, and album and artist names; organizes music; and lets you profile your own songs and contribute to the MoodLogic database. It's also a virtual DJ: you tell the program what music genre or tempo you're in the mood to hear, and MoodLogic serves up the tunes to match--from your own collection, of course. We love its organization and title-correction features, but we found that MoodLogic's database lacks depth. The service has some rough edges, and it's a bit pricey at $39.95, though it's currently on sale for $29.95. Wait for future releases, though, and give the free version a try--if only because there's nothing else like it.

Smooth interface; slow start-up
Once you download and install MoodLogic's 2.7MB file--for PCs only, sorry, Mac users--the program automatically opens a View box on the left side of the interface that links to the Activation Center, My Active Music, Search, Preferences, and Help. The center window displays song lists. As soon as you launch MoodLogic the first time, it searches for all the music files on your computer--MP3, WAV, Real, and WMA. Click Activate Music, and it checks your tunes against its network in order to activate them. One caveat: You need a broadband connection for this service. Over CNET's internal LAN, MoodLogic spent about 90 minutes categorizing 500 songs. When we activated about 8,000 songs over DSL, MoodLogic ran in the background for more than 24 hours.

Active lifestyle
So, what does it mean to "activate" your music? At your bidding, MoodLogic checks your song's waveforms against those in its database--a more accurate scan than reading metadata , ID3 tags, or filenames--which have been hand-ranked according to about 40 or 50 data points. Data points are such information as genre and subgenre, mood, instruments, energy level, emotion (such as sad, aggressive, uplifting, exciting), and type of lyrics (such as Love/Romance, Brooding/Cynicism, Sentimental, or Energy/Rebellion). The paid version activates 10,000 songs, but the free version limits you to just 25 activations, or so-called credits. However, with either version, you can profile songs yourself and earn more song credits.

If your song is fully profiled in the MoodLogic database, it appears in the My Active Music window with a green dot; partially profiled songs (with only album, artist, and song name) show up in the Activation Center window with a yellow dot, and unavailable songs display a red dot. With your collection of active music, you can use MoodLogic to compile playlists on the fly that match your frame of mind simply by specifying a genre, a tempo, or a mood or by searching for songs in your collection that sound alike.

Don't Miss

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Where to Buy

MoodLogic 2.0

Part Number: CNETMOODLOGIC2
Pricing is currently unavailable.