Monster Digital Le Mans review: Monster Digital Le Mans

Out of the box, the Monster Digital Le Mans is not formatted and doesn't contain any data. This is actually a good thing; it makes the cloning process faster since you don't need to erase it first. In the unlikely case that you choose to use it as an external drive, you'll need to format it, which is quite easy to do. The drive supports SATA 3 (6Gbps) but also worked with the SATA 2 (3Gbps) standard. In my testing, it worked with the Mac, PC, and Linux platforms.

Cost per gigabyte
When it comes to SSDs, the pricing is always the biggest concern, and the Le Mans fails in this regard, being arguably the most expensive on the market. The drive costs about $330 for 240GB or $200 for 120GB making it cost around $1.50 per gigabyte. Comparatively, the Intel 520 series costs just around $1 per gigabyte and most other SSDs cost even less than that. It seems that the Le Mans is going against the trend of SSD pricing, going higher instead of lower.

Performance
In my testing, the Monster Digital Le Mans wasn't slow, but it didn't impress, either.

When used as a secondary drive, where it could show off its top performance, the drive registered about 178MBps in copying speed, compared with the 230MBps of the Intel 520 series. When used as the main drive of the test computer and performing both read and write duties at the same time, it scored just about 121MBps, about average among its peers.

Obviously, the strength of an SSD is not in raw data transfer but in random access, as in the performance of applications. And in this case the Le Mans did quite well, allowing applications -- even resource-heavy ones -- to start up very quickly. The drive also cut down the time it took for the test computer to boot up and shut down. The machine woke up from sleep mode instantly.

Boot and shutdown time (in seconds)
(Shorter bars indicate better performance)
Shutdown  
Boot time  
WD VelociRaptor 300GB
12.2 
56.2 
WD VelociRaptor 600GB
7.9 
45.4 
SanDisk Ultra
7.2 
13.5 
Plextor M3
7 
13 
Crucial M4
6.8 
13.7 
OCZ Agility 3
6.7 
14.7 
OCZ Octane
6.3 
12 
SanDisk Extreme
6 
11 
Patriot Pyro
6 
12.5 
Samsung 830 Series
6 
13.3 
Plextor PX-256M2S
6 
13.5 
Monster Digital Le Mans
5.96 
13 
OCZ Vertex 3
5.8 
14.1 

Data transfer scores (in MBps)
(Longer bars indicate better performance)
As secondary drive  
As OS Drive  
Samsung 830 Series
261.63 
172.88 
OCZ Vertex 4 (512GB)
246.55 
168.36 
RunCore Pro V 7mm
236.71 
155.89 
Plextor M5 Pro
251.19 
155.65 
Intel 520 Series
230.01 
154.01 
OCZ Vertex 3
260.71 
150.01 
OCZ Vertex 4 (256GB)
190.34 
148.33 
OCZ Octane
183.41 
135.43 
Monster Digital Le Mans
177.56 
121.11 
Crucial M4
235.51 
117.99 
SanDisk Extreme
234.15 
117.66 
Plextor M3
221.98 
110.4 
OCZ Agility 3
207.75 
101.67 
RunCore Pro V Max
186.78 
92.55 
Patriot Pyro
190.01 
76.44 
SanDisk Ultra
96.4 
65.6 
WD VelociRaptor 600GB
126.33 
58.05 
Seagate Barracuda XT
115.71 
51.1 
WD VelociRaptor 300GB
112.59 
47.12 

Conclusion
With good performance and expensive pricing, the Monster Digital Le Mans doesn't make an ideal upgrade. If you can afford it, however, it will give a great performance improvement if your system currently uses a traditional hard drive.

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Quick Specifications See All

  • Form Factor 2.5"
  • Hard Drive Type internal hard drive
  • Capacity 400 GB