Microsoft Xbox review: Microsoft Xbox

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CNET Editors' Rating

4 stars Excellent
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good Best under-the-hood specs; built-in broadband adapter; 8GB hard drive for music and saved-game storage; high-resolution display support.

The Bad Big and bulky; separate kit required to unlock DVD-viewing capability; no progressive-scan DVD playback.

The Bottom Line The Xbox is the most versatile console and perfectly complements a home-theater system.

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Updated 11/13/02
Microsoft's Xbox is a Trojan horse. The company has conquered the desktop and now seems intent on sneaking a PC into your living room. Yes, this black behemoth of a system looks and acts just like a video game machine--and a state-of-the-art one at that. But with built-in support for high-speed networking, an 8GB hard drive, DVD playback capabilities, and display support for HDTVs, the Xbox does more than just play games. Updated 11/13/02
Microsoft's Xbox is a Trojan horse. The company has conquered the desktop and now seems intent on sneaking a PC into your living room. Yes, this black behemoth of a system looks and acts just like a video game machine--and a state-of-the-art one at that. But with built-in support for high-speed networking, an 8GB hard drive, DVD playback capabilities, and display support for HDTVs, the Xbox does more than just play games.

No small feat
With a front-loading disc tray, two buttons, and four controller ports adorning the face, the monstrous case will look at right at home among your other home-theater components. Inside this eight-pound box you'll find the power of a PC (a 733MHz Intel processor; 64MB of RAM; and a custom Nvidia graphics board, the NV2A) and the heart of a video game console. Still, as nice as all that processing power is, what really matter is the onscreen results.

Video enthusiasts will appreciate that the Xbox works not only with standard 4:3 TVs but with HDTVs as well. If you have an HD-ready set, you can set the Xbox to output 480p, 720p, and 1,080i signals in either normal or wide-screen (16:9) aspect ratios for your games. The Xbox is capable of producing 1,080i images, but the games themselves, such as Halo and Dead or Alive 3, haven't been optimized for that high a level yet. Still, the images are crisp and sharp. A nice complement to this visual horsepower is the fact that the Xbox supports 5.1 Dolby Digital surround sound and deliver 256 simultaneous voice channels--previously unheard of in a game system. All of this adds up to some of the richest, most realistic experiences we've yet to see in video games.

However, to get the most out of the system, you will have to spend some extra cash on optional accessories. The Xbox ships with composite video cables and RCA audio outputs like every other game console. But for improved audio and video performance, you'll have to spring for the $15 Advanced AV Pack, which has an S-Video connector as well as optical digital audio jacks. The $20 High Definition AV Pack offers component video connectors (Y, Pb, Pr), plus the optical digital audio jacks. And what about DVD playback? Well, unlike the PS2, which plays DVDs right out of the box, you'll need to shell out an additional $30 for the DVD Movie Playback Kit. (Note to videophiles: Even with the extra kit, the Xbox won't output your movies in 480p, so hold on to that progressive-scan DVD player.)

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Where to Buy

Microsoft Xbox

Part Number: F2300097

Pricing is currently unavailable.

Quick Specifications See All

  • Color black
  • Media Type DVD