Microsoft Wireless Entertainment Desktop 7000 review: Microsoft Wireless Entertainment Desktop 7000

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CNET Editors' Rating

3 stars Good
  • Overall: 6.7
  • Installation and interface: 6.0
  • Features: 8.0
  • Service and support: 6.0

Average User Rating

0.5 stars 1 user review
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good Media and cursor keyboard buttons make it easy to control your desktop from across the room.

The Bad Curved design adds little comfort and makes typing imprecise; keyboard doesn't grip your desk as well as it should.

The Bottom Line Microsoft fits a number of useful features on to the keyboard in its new Wireless Entertainment Desktop 7000 set, but we're not sold. We'll give it credit for its easy-to-use media control buttons, but the keyboard lacks too much overall polish compared to competing products to earn a stronger recommendation.

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Microsoft's new $150 Wireless Entertainment Desktop 7000 mouse and keyboard set comes chock-full of the features we expect from a media-oriented input device package. From the long-range Bluetooth connectivity to the touch-sensitive keyboard cursor control to the smartly placed media control buttons, it's clear that Microsoft gave a lot of thought to how it expects people will want to interact with a PC that doubles as a digital entertainment hub. It's too bad, then, that the company didn't put more thought into the keyboard as a typing device. That issue and strong competition from Logitech prevent us from giving this keyboard a higher recommendation.

Your reviewer will confess right away to a long-standing dislike of Microsoft's old split-tray "natural" keyboard design. Perhaps it is, as Microsoft claims, more ergonomically correct, but the traditional keyboard layout has always felt more efficient. The keyboard in the Wireless Entertainment Desktop 7000 set has contiguous rows of keys, but they're still laid out in a curve along a 6 degree arc. The result is that several keys are wider than they would be otherwise, which means that typing will involve a lot of mistaken key presses until you get used to it. Microsoft itself told us that 10 percent of its customers are "loyal split-keyboard users but the other 90 percent find the ergo/split design too daunting." This keyboard's new ComfortCurve design is supposed to preserve the ergonomics of the split models without all the awkwardness, but we found it just as irritating.

On the other hand, if you connect the Wireless Entertainment Desktop 7000 to a living-room PC, you might not worry so much about typing as you will about its ability to navigate Windows Media Center or other media player software from across the room. In that respect, the Wireless Entertainment Desktop 7000 fairs better. You'll probably ditch the mouse (a functional-if-boring laser-based model), instead relying on the keyboard's hot keys and good-enough touch-sensitive cursor control pad. The touch pad is better than that of Logitech's diNovo Edge, because of a toggle switch that changes the cursor from a free-floating mouse arrow to a more linear, directional-pad-style selector for navigating menu options. We also like the large, easy-to-reach volume, channel, and media play buttons, which the diNovo Edge hides inaccessibly as alternative commands to the function keys on its top edge.

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Where to Buy See all prices

Microsoft Wireless Entertainment Desktop 7000

Part Number: 69Z-00001
MSRP: $149.95 Low Price: $179.95 See all prices

Quick Specifications See All

  • Device Type Keyboard and mouse set - wireless
  • Compatibility PC