Mac OS X 10.2 Jaguar review: Mac OS X 10.2 Jaguar

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CNET Editors' Rating

4 stars Excellent
Review Date:
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The Good Greatly improves Mac, Windows, and Internet networking; refines Web and hard drive search tool; upgrades performance and responsiveness; includes Bluetooth support; new discount for five-user licenses.

The Bad No upgrade pricing for copies of OS X purchased before July 17; bundled iChat 1.0 isn't as versatile as AIM; still no Google search in Sherlock.

The Bottom Line Take a good, hard look at Mac OS X 10.2 if you're adding a Mac to a Windows network--Jaguar's new tools can't be beat. But home users, beware the $129 upgrade price if you're not looking for networking options.

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Jaguar, Apple's new version of Mac OS X, packs a much bigger upgrade wallop than its 10.2 version number suggests. Part of the punch is the price: Jaguar costs $129 (no upgrade discount if you bought before July 17) for one user or $199 for a five-user license. But its slightly improved interface, powerful new networking tools, three new applications, and better performance and stability finally bring to fruition Mac OS X's potential. If you bought OS X 10.1 recently and aren't looking for networking support, $129 is too much to pay. But if you're a business user or have a cross-platform home network, take a serious look at Jaguar. Jaguar, Apple's new version of Mac OS X, packs a much bigger upgrade wallop than its 10.2 version number suggests. Part of the punch is the price: Jaguar costs $129 (no upgrade discount if you bought before July 17) for one user or $199 for a five-user license. But its slightly improved interface, powerful new networking tools, three new applications, and better performance and stability finally bring to fruition Mac OS X's potential. If you bought OS X 10.1 recently and aren't looking for networking support, $129 is too much to pay. But if you're a business user or have a cross-platform home network, take a serious look at Jaguar.

Installation and interface
OS X's installation hasn't changed much in Jaguar; it's as easy as ever, despite involving two discs. You're forced to enter quite a bit of personal information at setup, which gets sent to Apple for registration and marketing purposes. Read the privacy policy before you give out your phone number or e-mail address. Jaguar uses some of the registration information for your benefit; for example, Sherlock's new Yellow Pages search feature automatically provides driving directions from the location that you specify as your home address.

Once you start up in Jaguar, you'll notice subtle, refined changes to the Aqua interface. The bulbous, primary-colored buttons now look flatter and are more subtly tinted, while other indicators, including drag-and-drop plus signs, sport a 3D design. Dialog boxes now display more information, too. For example, the streamlined Show Info box displays all data at once, instead of dividing it into tabs. Plus, you can now open multiple Show Info dialogs simultaneously.

Still longing for the handy spring-loaded folders feature from OS 8 and 9? Jaguar makes a concession just for you: folder after folder will open automatically as you drag a file over them, and all but the last one will close when you release the mouse button.

Find anything, anywhere
Jaguar's most compelling interface changes lie in its revamped Find commands. Apple has moved hard disk search functions out of Sherlock, OS X's search tool, and into the Finder. Now, when you open a Finder window, its toolbar offers a handy field that lets you search a particular folder, drive, or network volume. The Find command in the Finder's File Menu (command-F) brings up a streamlined advanced file-search dialog. We love the separated search, as the previous Sherlock often presented a confusing list of online and offline results.

In contrast, Sherlock 3.0 now searches the Internet only, neatly aggregating common Web search results into a single desktop window--no need for a browser. Sherlock even organizes Web search choices into channels, which it displays as toolbar buttons. For example, the eBay channel lets you search and track items by name and price range, then returns photos and auction data right in your Sherlock window. The Yellow Pages channel displays maps and directions, and the AppleCare channel presents entire Apple Knowledge Base articles, all within Sherlock. Our only complaint is that the general Internet channel includes only five search engines--and the preeminent Google is still not among them. Worse, both the five search engines and the Yellow Pages are fixed, so you can't switch, for example, to your favorite map site.

Networking wonders
Simple productivity changes aside, Jaguar adds some seriously impressive networking tools. Any of these improvements would be a major breakthrough for the Mac OS; together, they more than justify Jaguar's price tag for anyone who runs a Mac on a network. Rendezvous, a dynamic discovery and self-configuration technology based on the ZeroConf standards, makes connecting to IP devices as easy as it was with the old AppleTalk. Plug in two Jaguar Macs to an Ethernet cable, for instance, and the systems configure their own TCP/IP addresses and locate each other in seconds. Jaguar also immediately recognizes any available wireless 802.11b network, presents it by name, and lets you connect with a simple click (and a password, of course).

But Jaguar's new Windows networking features take the cake. Adding a Mac to a Windows network is as easy as breathing. You no longer need to type in a server IP address or URL (as with 10.1). Windows servers now show up by name in the Connect To Server command of the Go menu. Simply double-click a name to mount the server on your Jaguar desktop and start browsing it.

Windows browsing from a Mac
On top of that, Windows users can now log on to Mac OS X and access Mac files. To enable the sharing, click System Preferences > Sharing, and check the box next to Windows File Sharing. Jaguar generates a URL that you can give out to approved Windows users so that they can access public files using the Windows SMB protocol--something that was impossible in Mac OS X 10.1. And, thank goodness, Jaguar now includes built-in virtual private networking. In the Internet Connect utility in the Utilities folder under Applications, click File > "New VPN connection window," and Jaguar lets you create a PPTP connection to a Windows VPN server so that you can connect remotely over high-speed access.

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