Logitech Anywhere MX Mouse review: Logitech Anywhere MX Mouse

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CNET Editors' Rating

3.5 stars Very good
  • Overall: 7.7
  • Design: 7.0
  • Features: 8.0
  • Performance: 8.0

Average User Rating

2.5 stars 6 user reviews
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good Darkfield technology tracks on any surface including glass; Unifying receiver pairs easily with other Logitech peripherals; power button conserves battery life; runs off a single AA battery.

The Bad Pricier than other mobile mice; smooth vertical rocker lacks precision.

The Bottom Line The Anywhere Mouse MX bears Logitech's multiconnective Unifying receiver and glass-tracking Darkfield laser, but $80 is too much for a portable mouse--especially when the Microsoft Wireless Mobile Mouse 4000 costs half the price for almost the same features.

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Not to be outdone by Microsoft and its BlueTrack laser tracking technology, Logitech recently introduced the Anywhere Mouse MX with Logitech's new Darkfield laser sensor. Darkfield tracks on almost all surfaces, including nonmirrored glass--a surface where even Microsoft's BlueTrack doesn't work. The mouse also uses the company's new Unifying technology that lets you connect up to six Unifying-compatible keyboards and mice to the same USB transceiver. Both innovations boost the functionality of the Anywhere Mouse MX, but we can't recommend an $80 mobile accessory, especially when Microsoft's $40 Wireless Mobile Mouse 4000 works just as well on almost every other surface.

The Logitech Anywhere Mouse MX is meant to be the travel-size companion to the new Logitech Performance Mouse MX, but with a few key differences. First, the device is smaller and easier to fit into a laptop bag. Second, unlike the sculpted shape of the Performance MX, this device is perfectly symmetrical to accommodate both left- and right-handed users, although we suspect that lefties might stumble over the two thumb buttons on the left side. Still, the mouse is very comfortable to use; the shape easily conforms to your hand and the surface is covered with a thin, lightly textured coating that makes it easy to grip and move around.

The scroll wheel sits between the two main buttons and moves from side to side as well as up and down. Pressing the scroll dial itself changes it between ratcheted and smooth scrolling. The button directly below the wheel is preset to activate the new Windows Vista Flip 3D overlay where you can quickly view all of your open windows in a digitally organized stack. As with most mice, you can reassign all the buttons with the included SetPoint 4.8 software.

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Quick Specifications See All

  • Connector Type 4 pin USB Type A
  • Type USB
  • OS Required Microsoft Windows 7
  • Type mouse
  • Movement Detection Technology laser
  • Connectivity Technology wireless
  • Form Factor AA type
  • Compatibility Mac
About The Author

Justin Yu covers headphones and peripherals for CNET. When he's not wading through Web gulch or challenging colleagues to typing tests, you can find him making fun of technology with Jeff Bakalar every afternoon on The 404 show.