Lenovo IdeaPad K1 review: Lenovo IdeaPad K1

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CNET Editors' Rating

3.5 stars Very good
  • Overall: 7.3
  • Design: 7.0
  • Features: 8.0
  • Performance: 7.0

Average User Rating

3 stars 11 user reviews
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good Lenovo's IdeaPad K1 packs in all of the best features found in today's modern Honeycomb tablets (upgradeable to Android 4.0) and offers some unique Android optimizations and preloaded apps.

The Bad The design is thick and heavy compared with the latest from Apple and Samsung, not all of the Android tweaks pay off, and the screen isn't as bright as it could be.

The Bottom Line Lenovo plays it safe with the IdeaPad K1, delivering a solid tablet that does little to stand out from the Honeycomb herd.

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Since the release of the first Android Honeycomb tablet (the Motorola Xoom), we've seen a parade of more or less identical devices. Some are thinner or sport better cameras or extra ports, but they all run the same software on the same 1GHz dual-core Tegra 2 processor.

The Lenovo IdeaPad K1 is no exception. Priced at $499 (32GB) and available in three color options (red, white, and black), Lenovo's Honeycomb (upgradeable to Android 4.0) tablet is neither the thinnest, the cheapest, the prettiest, nor the best equipped. Instead, Lenovo's tablet sits modestly in the middle of the pack.

Editors note: For the differences between Honeycomb and Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) check out the Android 4.0 breakdown comparison on the Asus Eee Pad Transformer Prime review.

Design and hardware features
If we had to pick the IdeaPad K1 out of a lineup, the two-tone design on the back would be the giveaway. Weaving a mixture of sturdy aluminum and glossy plastic, the tablet's back has a good hand feel that suffers only slightly from visible smudges.

The second telltale feature of the K1 is its dedicated home button, located on the right side of the 10.1-inch screen (when held in landscape orientation). Considering the onscreen navigation controls baked into Honeycomb, the physical home button is redundant. It's not pointless, though. Aside from fitting naturally under your right thumb while gripping the tablet, the physical button has a few cool tricks. For instance, holding the button down will capture a snapshot of the current screen. A downward swipe on the button will back you out of apps or menus. It's neat, though we have to admit that it was triggered accidentally on several occasions.

The rest of the design choices are all fairly predictable. On the left side you'll find a power button, volume rocker, screen orientation lock, and a microSD card slot. The bottom edge offers a Micro-HDMI port, a headphone jack, and a dock input that works both for charging and USB sync. Shutterbugs will also notice a 2-megapixel camera on the front and a 5-megapixel camera (with flash) on the back.

Lenovo's spin on Android
Android tablet makers are in a tough position. Android purists are always quick to criticize when a manufacturer monkeys with Google's code or bundles unnecessary software. But without these idiosyncrasies, it's nearly impossible to make a Honeycomb tablet that can stand out and showcase a company's brand.

For better or worse, the Android 3.1 installed on the Lenovo IdeaPad K1 is not for purists. It comes with more than 30 apps preinstalled, ranging from big names like Netflix and Kindle, to in-house productions, like SocialTouch (a messaging aggregator) and Lenovo App Shop.

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Quick Specifications See All

  • Release date Aug 4, 2011
  • Wireless Connectivity IEEE 802.11n
    IEEE 802.11b
    Bluetooth 2.1 EDR
    IEEE 802.11g
  • Type Android 3.1 (Honeycomb)
  • Weight 1.6 lbs