Kodak EasyShare V610 review: Kodak EasyShare V610

Movie mode maxes out at 640x480, 30 frames per second, and can record clips as long as 80 minutes; it includes digital image stabilization to compensate for your coffee-addled nerves. The MPEG-4 clips can be trimmed in-camera. Plus, you can extract individual frames as low-res stills or print them in 4-, 9-, or 16-up composites.

Breaking with the usual EasyShare tradition, the V610 doesn't ship with a dock, though the ImageLink connector on the camera bottom lets you use it with one of Kodak's printer docks. Of course the built-in Bluetooth means you don't have to place the camera on the dock to communicate with Kodak's EasyShare Printer Dock Plus Series 3. You can also use Bluetooth to transfer photos to or from a slew of Bluetooth-enabled devices, including cell phones and computers.

Since there's no dock, the camera charges via a small wall plug that connects to a small jack on V610's left side. The camera also ships with an ImageLink-to-USB adapter, so you can connect it directly to a computer if needed. A very short, class-leading shutter lag of 0.2 second in high-contrast light seems to be the performance highlight for the Kodak EasyShare V610. That drops to a less impressive 1 second under low-contrast light. Time to first shot runs just 1.3 seconds, while the shot-to-shot time clocks in at a decent 1.8 seconds regardless of flash. The V610 also captures up to 8 frames at about 2.2 frames per second (fps) in both 6- and 1.1-megapixel modes. As with the V570, the screen does not black out between shots in burst mode, which can be useful for panning bursts.

The big 2.8-inch LCD gains up effectively for low-light shooting, and while it loses some of its verve in bright sunlight, it's still usable for framing. That's a good thing, considering it lacks an optical viewfinder. At 38mm, the flash covers out to about 11 feet at ISO 200, while at full telephoto, it covers about 10 feet at ISO 400--average for a small camera that runs on a 720mAh lithium-ion battery. The camera's red-eye-reduction function successfully eliminated most of the ominous crimson glow from our subjects' eyes.

Shooting speed
(Shorter bars indicate better performance)
Typical shot-to-shot time  
Time to first shot  
Shutter lag (typical)  
Kodak EasyShare V610
1.8 
1.3 
0.2 
Casio Exilim EX-Z850
2.7 
2.1 
0.5 
Canon PowerShot A530
2.8 
2.1 
0.5 
Fujifilm FinePix V10
2.0 
1.5 
0.5 
Canon PowerShot SD700 IS
1.6 
1.5 
0.5 
Panasonic Lumix DMC-LZ3
2.6 
2.9 
1.0 
Note: Seconds

Typical continuous-shooting speed
(Longer bars indicate better performance)
Note: Frames per second
The Kodak EasyShare V610 exhibits some of the same image-quality problems we've seen before in certain Kodak cameras, including purple fringing on high-contrast edges and some blooming in highlights.

Overall, the camera tends to either overexpose highlights or underexpose shadows. Noise creeps in even at lower ISO settings. Images shot at ISO 64 are, of course, the cleanest but still show traces of colored specs, especially in darker colors. The camera keeps this under control at ISO 100, but by ISO 200, noise is noticeable and becomes obvious at ISO 400. Images shot at ISO 800 are generally not fit to print.

Auto white balance produces a slightly warm cast, while the tungsten setting turns out a touch too cool under our tungsten test lights. On the plus side, colors are fully saturated. Reds, oranges, purples, and greens look convincing and natural.

What you'll pay

Pricing is currently unavailable.

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Where to Buy

Kodak EasyShare V610

Part Number: 8636763 Released: May 7, 2006

MSRP: $349.95

See manufacturer website for availability.

Quick Specifications See All

  • Release date May 7, 2006
  • Optical Zoom 10
  • Optical Sensor Type CCD
  • Sensor Resolution 6.0 Megapixel
  • Optical Sensor Size 1/2.5"