Kodak EasyShare P720 review: Kodak EasyShare P720

The frame displays only JPEG still images--no video or audio. For moving pictures you'll have to step up to one of Kodak's higher-end frames that also have small, built-in speakers for sound. Pretty much all you can do is set the types of transitions you want in the slideshow (nine options are available, including "random" and "none") and set a timer to activate the slideshow during certain hours (a clock is built into the unit). You can also set your pictures to display in their native 4:3 aspect ratio or have it fill the entire with a little on-the-fly cropping of the picture.

The images we looked at on the frame looked OK from a distance of 4 or 5 feet, though it has a very small dynamic range: whites get blown out and skin tones are a little off. Get closer, however, and your images can look a little soft and pixelated because there's just not a whole lot of resolution to work with (you can see individual pixels). As is the case with all these lower-resolution frames, close-ups look best; there's not a lot of detail in subjects standing farther back or background imagery. Also, you'll get stair-stepping (read: jagged edges) in curved lines, such as the profile of a subject's shoulder. Finally, though the frame can operate in vertical mode, because it's so small it has a narrower off-axis viewing angle than usual in this position; the picture completely inverts/disappears when viewed from the side.

In sum, the P720 is a basic photo frame that's designed to be relatively affordable and easy to use. For about $70, it's an OK value, but if you're looking for better image quality, we strongly recommend spending the extra dough and stepping up to a larger, higher-resolution model.

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