Kodak EasyShare M580 review: Kodak EasyShare M580

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

CNET Editors' Rating

3.5 stars Very good
  • Overall: 7.0
  • Design: 7.0
  • Features: 7.0
  • Performance: 7.0
  • Image quality: 7.0
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good Wide-angle lens with 8x zoom in a compact body; larger than average LCD; easy photo, video sharing directly from the camera; Mini-HDMI output.

The Bad Button design can make use tricky; always starts in auto mode.

The Bottom Line The Kodak EasyShare M580 is a solid value for snapshooters in need of a versatile lens in a pocketable package.

Editors' Top Picks

Editors' note: Kodak released a firmware update for the EasyShare M580 that fixes a problem that causes the camera to lock up when changing shooting modes. The update and directions on installation can be found on Kodak's support page.

The Kodak EasyShare M580 is best described as a very good compact camera with some quirks. Its highlight feature is its 28mm-equivalent wide-angle lens with an 8x zoom. That lens gives you more shooting flexibility than most basic digital cameras, but without the weight and bulk of a compact megazoom. It also has a 3-inch LCD, which is large for its class, and if you like to share your photos with friends and family by e-mail or online, Kodak's Share button and software make the process simple.

Those who like to leave things in auto all the time will definitely want to read on, though. While Kodak's Smart Capture auto mode produces very good photos, it's not a solution to all shooting situations. As for shooting performance, it has low shutter lag, but takes nearly 3 seconds to start up. There are also some other design and feature oddities that kept the M580 from rating higher. Still, these things might not be deal breakers for everyone and the camera is otherwise a solid value.

If you can't live with the M580's few shortcomings, there are other options worth checking out with similar midrange zoom lenses and features.

Key specs Kodak EasyShare M580
Price (MSRP) $169.95
Dimensions (WHD) 4 x 2.3 x 1 inches
Weight (with battery and media) 5.9 ounces
Megapixels, image sensor size, type 14 megapixels, 1/2.3-inch CCD
LCD size, resolution/viewfinder 3-inch LCD, 230K dots/None
Lens (zoom, aperture, focal length) 8x, f3.3-5.7, 28-224mm (35mm equivalent)
File format (still/video) JPEG/H.264 AAC (.MOV)
Highest resolution size (still/video) 4,288x3,216 pixels/ 1,280x720 at 30fps
Image stabilization type Mechanical and digital
Battery type, CIPA rated life Li-ion rechargeable, 200 shots
Battery charged in camera Yes; USB cable and wall adapter included
Storage media SD/SDHC
Bundled software Kodak EasyShare 8.2, Share Button app (Windows, Mac)

Available in five colors, the M580's angular design looks oddly dated for a 2010 model. Its metal casing does give it a better feel than its price would suggest, and with just a slight lip for the lens barrel the camera easily slips in and out of a pocket. While most models in its class use 2.7-inch LCDs, Kodak used a 3-inch display. It gets fairly bright, but like almost all LCDs it can be difficult to see your subject correctly in direct sunlight.

On top are buttons for power, flash settings, shooting modes, and the shutter release. All of them are edge to edge, similarly shaped, and flush with the body, which can make pressing the button you want a little difficult, especially if you're not looking. This can probably be overcome in time with use, but it's not an ideal button layout for anyone who frequently changes flash settings or shooting modes.

Down the right side of the LCD are Delete, Menu, Info/help, and Playback buttons. Slightly to the right of those is a directional pad for navigating menus and browsing photos and movies as well as Kodak's Share button. Unlike the ones on top, these buttons are well spaced and easy to press. Kodak expanded the usefulness of its Share button in 2010, allowing you to quickly tag photos and movies for posting to Facebook, Flickr, and YouTube in addition to directly sending them to e-mail addresses or compatible Kodak digital photo frames that you've stored in the M580. Once you download and install the Share Button application, you can tag photos or videos in camera and then connect the camera by USB to a computer, and the software handles the rest.

The menu system is simple to navigate, as there are only two tabs: one for shooting options, another for camera setup. There are a few settings absent that might bug potential users, though. There is no way to shut off the image stabilization, for example. Presumably it shuts off when the camera is on a tripod, but maybe not. There's also no way to turn on a date stamp or turn off quickview, the instant playback of shots after they've been taken. (Date stamps can be added one at a time in playback and quickview can be quickly canceled with a half press of the shutter release, though.)

On the bottom is a sliding door covering the battery and memory card compartment. It doesn't lock, but it does firmly close to help prevent it from accidentally coming open. The battery is charged in camera with an included USB cable. You can either charge by computer or with an included wall adapter. On the right side is a flip-open cover protecting Micro-USB and Mini-HDMI ports, the latter a rarity on cameras at this price. There's also an IR receiver built in for an optional remote control to operate the camera's playback when connected to an external display or HDTV.

General shooting options Kodak EasyShare M580
ISO sensitivity (full resolution) Auto (80-400), 80, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1,600
White balance Auto, Daylight, Tungsten, Fluorescent, Open Shade
Recording modes Smart Capture, Program, Scene modes, Video
Focus modes Multi-zone AF, Center-zone AF, Face Priority AF, Macro AF, Infinity AF
Macro 3.6 inches (Wide); 3.3 feet (Tele)
Metering modes Multi-zone, Center-zone , Face Priority
Color effects High Color, Natural Color, Low Color, Black & White, Sepia
Burst mode shot limit (full resolution) 3 shots

Editors' Top Picks

 

ARTICLE DISCUSSION

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Where to Buy

MSRP: $199.95

See manufacturer website for availability.

Quick Specifications See All

  • Optical Zoom 8 x
  • Optical Sensor Type CCD
  • Sensor Resolution 14.0 Megapixel
  • Image Stabilizer optical
About The Author

Joshua Goldman is a senior editor for CNET Reviews, covering cameras, camcorders, and related accessories. He has been writing about and reviewing consumer technology and software since 2000.