Kensington FM transmitter review: Kensington FM transmitter

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CNET Editors' Rating

3 stars Good
  • Overall: 6.3
  • Design: 6.0
  • Features: 7.0
  • Performance: 6.0
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good The Kensington RDS FM transmitter has decent signal strength and sound quality and is the first transmitter to use RDS technology for beaming song info to a compatible car stereo; it has three presets, uses the iPod screen for FM tuning, and recharges an iPod.

The Bad The Kensington RDS FM transmitter has a poorly designed base unit, and it can occasionally freeze the iPod. In addition, there is no audio line input, and the RDS feature requires a compatible car stereo (while RDS is common, we didn't easily find one). Also, the RDS feature only works with Nanos and 5G iPods.

The Bottom Line The Kensington RDS FM transmitter works well enough, but unless you find RDS data necessary (and you have an RDS-compatible car stereo), you should consider another model.

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Accessories big shot Kensington has unveiled the world's first RDS FM transmitter for the iPod. So what's different about this $89.99 piece of car gear? It wirelessly transmits your iPod's song and artist info to your compatible car stereo display using the increasingly popular Radio Data System (RDS). The RDS standard, adopted in the States in 1993, allows broadcasters to use an FM subfrequency to add text and other metadata, such as song titles and radio station names. While the RDS feature worked well in our tests (once we found a compatible stereo, that is) and the transmitter has decent signal strength and sound quality, we are still hesitant to recommend it wholeheartedly. Here's why.

According to Kensington, "RDS is now available in most vehicle models offered by leading U.S. and foreign automakers. Our research indicates that over 80 percent of all new cars being sold in the U.S. include RDS-enabled stereos." RDS may soon become mainstream, but in four of the six autos we tried to test the transmitter with, RDS was not even supported. In addition, the $100,000 BMW M6 that car editor Kevin Massy is reviewing supported RDS, but its annoyingly unintuitive iDrive entertainment system failed to display our iPod's track info. We did manage to find a car that worked (Jeep Cherokee) and found the heads-up view of song/track info on our stereo to be quite cool, though more for its gee whiz factor than its usefulness. On several occasions we instinctively tried to press a button on the stereo to change tracks.

With that said, the transmitter itself is a mixed bag. It's in-line style, with the iPod connecting to the end of the cable via a dock connector. It's important to note that this unit will not work with the 3G iPod; furthermore the RDS feature will only work with Nanos and the 5G iPod with video-- the 4G iPod is limited to the FM transmitter. The unit's main piece plugs into a car lighter adapter, as many FM transmitters do. Its odd shape, though, makes it tough to fit it into the tight spaces surrounding your lighter adapter. By twisting the unit, we were able to plug into all of our test cars, but in most cases, we were not able to easily access the power switch. A rare FM transmitter feature, the aim of the switch is to prevent battery drain in some cars, though it won't operate or recharge your iPod unless your car's engine is running (at least not in the cars we tested).

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