JayBird Endorphin Rush Athletic Earphones review: JayBird Endorphin Rush Athletic Earphones

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CNET Editors' Rating

3.5 stars Very good
  • Overall: 7.3
  • Design: 7.0
  • Features: 8.0
  • Performance: 7.0
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good The JayBird Endorphin Rush Earphones offer a durable cable design with a thick cord, a reinforced L-plug, and a slider to prevent tangles. The package includes a hard-sided case, a cable manager, various eartips, and removable earclips that make for a supersecure fit. The earphones offer deep bass.

The Bad The earpieces of the Jaybird Endorphin Earphones are large and may not fit all users comfortably, and some music comes across sounding hollow and lacking in warmth.

The Bottom Line The JayBird Endorphin Rush earphones are a good choice for active people who want secure fitting earbuds without sacrificing bass or overall sound quality.

Editors' Top Picks

JayBird first made a name for itself as a Bluetooth company, pushing out a line of stereo headphones with discreet-yet-secure designs that were made with the iPod in mind. So it was both surprising and not when the company elected to move into the wired market with two in-ear models aimed at the fitness-minded. What was surprising was the seemingly backwards step in technology, but it was actually a move inline with JayBird's focus on active users. Of the two new sets, the Endorphin Rush Athletic Earphones ($99) are the slightly more expensive and less stylish of the two.

Editors' Top Picks

 

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Where to Buy

JayBird Endorphin Rush Athletic Earphones

Part Number: EN1

Pricing is currently unavailable.

Quick Specifications See All

  • Weight 0.5 oz
  • Sound Output Mode stereo
  • Additional Features Crystal clear
    Sound isolation
  • Type headphones
  • Headphones Form Factor in-ear
  • Connector Type mini-phone stereo 3.5 mm
About The Author

Since 2003, Jasmine France has worked at CNET covering everything from scanners to keyboards to GPS devices to MP3 players. She currently cohosts the Crave podcast and spends the majority of her time testing headphones, music software, and mobile apps.