Intel X25-M High Performance SSD (80GB) review: Intel X25-M High Performance SSD (80GB)

CNET Editors' Rating

4 stars Excellent
  • Overall: 8.3
  • Design: 8.0
  • Features: 7.0
  • Performance: 10.0
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good Fast transfer speeds; improves laptop battery life; shorter boot times.

The Bad Expensive; low gigabyte-to-dollar ratio.

The Bottom Line Intel's X-25M solid-state hard drive enjoys several advantages over both spinning disk drives as well as other SSDs, including improvements to data throughput, boot time, and laptop battery life. Its one drawback is that it's pricier than even its other solid-state competition, but if you can forget about its cost, this is by far the fastest data drive available.

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Intel's X-25M solid-state hard drive represents a major leap forward for the solid-state drive category. While we've heard about the benefits of solid-state hard drives for years--faster access and boot times, improved battery life--Intel's drive raises expectations for the category as a whole. You will most definitely have to pay more for it. Intel's official pricing is $595 per 1,000 units for our 80GB model, and actual pricing for individual units is more like $700 at online retailers. That gives this drive the worst gigabyte-to-dollar ratio among competing products. But if improving performance is your main concern, the Intel X-25M is the clear winner, and we recommend it to those of you for whom price is unimportant..

Instead of storing data on traditional hard disks, solid-state drives use large blocks of flash-based NAND memory, which means these drives have no moving parts to malfunction over time. With no physical platter to spin like traditional hard drives, SSDs are faster at accessing data, and they also use less power and generate less heat, of particular benefit to laptops.


The data and power connectors on the X-25M look the same as those on a traditional hard drive.

At the time of this review, Intel only offers one 80GB capacity drive, but it's available in 2.5-inch and 1.8-inch sizes for compatibility with a variety of modern desktops and laptops. The Serial ATA data and power inputs on the Intel drive mirror those of other SSDs as well as traditional hard drives, so while you may need drive rails to adapt it to a desktop chassis, the physical cable connections remain unchanged.

As exciting as we find SSDs, and in particular Intel's new model, their limitations are not insignificant to the average consumer. As you can see from our chart below, the price-per-gigabyte of a typical 160GB desktop hard drive is almost 10 times less than that of previous generation SSD drives, and almost 25 times that of Intel's new model. That makes the value proposition for Intel's new SSD, from a pure-gigabytes-per-dollar perspective, very hard to stomach.

Model Capacity Est. street price Cost per GB
Intel X-25M 80GB $700 $8.75
Super Talent MasterDrive MX 120GB $435 $3.63
OCZ Core Series 128GB $434 $3.39
Patriot Warp V.2 128GB $440 $3.44
Western Digital Caviar 160GB $60 38 cents
Seagate Momentus 200GB $80 30 cents

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Where to Buy See All

Intel X25-M High Performance SSD (80GB), 1st generation

Part Number: SSDSA2MH080G1
Low Price: $515.47 See all prices

Quick Specifications See All

  • Form Factor 2.5"
  • Hard Drive Type internal hard drive
  • Interface Type Serial ATA-300
  • Capacity 80 GB
About The Author

Rich Brown is an executive editor for CNET Reviews. He has worked as a technology journalist since 1994.

About The Author

Justin Yu covers headphones and peripherals for CNET. When he's not wading through Web gulch or challenging colleagues to typing tests, you can find him making fun of technology with Jeff Bakalar every afternoon on The 404 show.