iHome iH70SRC review: iHome iH70SRC

  •  
  • 1

CNET Editors' Rating

3 stars Good
  • Overall: 6.7
  • Design: 6.0
  • Features: 8.0
  • Performance: 6.0
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good The iHome iH70 is a set of PC speakers with an integrated iPod/iPhone dock that lets you play music, recharge your player, and sync it with your Windows or Mac PC. An auxiliary input and remote are also included.

The Bad The speakers look a little cheap; lack of GSM shielding means iPhones must be toggled to airplane mode; too many cables; no way to toggle inputs.

The Bottom Line Despite some budget design traits, the iHome iH70 effectively combines PC speakers and an iPod speaker dock in one product--but you can get the nearly identical black version for half as much.

Editors' Top Picks

While the company is more known for its iPod clock radios, iHome has been branching out into more iPod-related audio accessories in the last couple of years. Case in point: the iHome iH70 (also known as the "iH70SRC"), a pair of computer speakers with a built-in iPod dock and integrated USB connectivity for syncing your iPod--or iPhone--with your computer.

Let's start with the obvious: if all of your iPod's music is, presumably, already on your computer's hard drive, why do you even need your iPod in the room? Fair enough, but most of us would prefer the instant start-up of the iPod to the long boot sequence of the computer. Plus, the fact that the iH70 replaces an existing charge cradle will save a bit of clutter on most people's desks.

If the silver-colored speakers have a primary fault, it's that they look cheaper than they should for a product that lists for $150 (the online price is closer to $130). And here's where it gets a little strange: there's a black version of the speakers, the iHome iH69B. That version is only one-third as powerful (5 watts versus 15 for the iH69) and lacks a remote control, but it lists for $100, and is widely available for around $80. That price feels a lot closer to the actual value of what you're getting here.

Controls for power and volume up/down are conveniently placed on the front of the right speaker, while the iPod dock is embedded into the front of the left speaker. The speaker grilles are removable, which is nice, but pulling them off doesn't exactly reveal luxurious guts. Alas, you get a glimpse of more cheap-looking plastic and a single driver (there's no separate tweeter). Better to leave things covered up. At least, however, peeking behind the curtain shows that they were smart enough to position the drivers at the top end, so the left one won't be blocked when the iPod/iPhone is docked.

On a more positive note, the iH70s offer excellent connectivity--at least, they do if you're comparing them with most PC speakers. Around back you'll find two inputs: one for connecting the iH70 to your computer's audio output (or headphone port) and an auxiliary input in case you should want to connect another portable audio device. At first glance, there doesn't seem to be a headphone jack on the speakers themselves, but a closer inspection reveals one on the outside of the left speaker. The USB port is on the back of the left speaker; it's reserved for syncing your iPod or iPhone with iTunes on your Windows or Mac computer (the cable is included). You'll also need to connect the dedicated AC power supply.

Editors' Top Picks

 

ARTICLE DISCUSSION

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Quick Specifications See All

  • Speaker System Type PC multimedia speakers with Apple dock
  • Speaker Type portable speaker
  • Amplification Type active
  • Connectivity Technology wired
About The Author

Executive Editor David Carnoy has been a leading member of CNET's Reviews team since 2000. He covers the gamut of gadgets and is a notable e-reader and e-publishing expert. He's also the author of the novels Knife Music and The Big Exit. Both titles are available as Kindle, iBooks, and Nook e-books.