Fujitsu LifeBook T4220 review: Fujitsu LifeBook T4220

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CNET Editors' Rating

3 stars Good
  • Overall: 6.8
  • Design: 7.0
  • Features: 7.0
  • Performance: 6.0
  • Battery life: 7.0
  • Service and support: 7.0
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good Mostly strong performance, thanks to the Centrino Duo platform; excellent battery life; bidirectional display swivel; indoor/outdoor screen is highly visible.

The Bad Somewhat expensive; heavy; configuration could use more RAM; stylus is inelegantly stored in the display bezel.

The Bottom Line For business users who don't want to compromise, the Fujitsu LifeBook T4220 is both a full-fledged laptop and a handwriting-friendly tablet--though we recommend tweaking the base configuration.

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Editors Note: In our original review, we erred in our description of the LifeBook T4220's display. It rotates on a bidirectional swivel, and the screen orientation can be adjusted in all four directions. We regret the error. (7/10/07)

With four tablet models in its catalog, Fujitsu offers something for every potential tablet user. The LifeBook T4220, a Centrino Duo update to its earlier T4215 model, is targeted at users who want all the performance and features of a full-fledged laptop with added handwriting functionality. In that light, the LifeBook T4220 largely succeeds: it offers nearly every feature you'd expect on a thin-and-light laptop plus a sizable display for writing and lengthy battery life. However, its performance on our benchmarks was mixed; its paltry allotment of RAM held it back on one of our tests--though the fault is easily fixed with a $150 upgrade. While not as elegant as the Lenovo ThinkPad X61 Tablet (which lacks a built-in optical drive), the highly configurable LifeBook T4220 is a solid choice for business users who want a tablet PC without compromise.

Price as reviewed / Starting price $2,249 / $1,769
Processor 2.2GHz Intel Core 2 Duo T7500
Memory 1GB of 667MHz DDR2
Hard drive 100GB at 5,400rpm
Graphics Intel GMA X3100 (integrated)
Chipset Mobile Intel 945GM Express
Operating system Windows Vista Business
Dimensions (WDH) 11.5x9.5x1.3 inches
Screen size (diagonal) 12.1 inches (standard aspect)
System weight / Weight with AC adapter 4.8 / 5.7 pounds
Category thin-and-light

While the LifeBook T4220 falls in the middle of the weight range for a thin-and-light laptop, it is a bit hefty for a tablet; we were able to cradle it in one arm, clipboard-style, but never for more than a few minutes. Like most tablets larger than a UMPC, the LifeBook T4220 seems best for those who want to take handwritten notes while sitting at a desk or conference table.

The LifeBook T4220's 12.1-inch display offers a

Like its predecessor, the LifeBook T4220 features a bidirectional swivel, which lets you twist the screen in any direction you like. When you rotate and fold down the display, the computer automatically locks the laptop's optical disc drive and rotates the screen 90 degrees into portrait mode. A button alongside the display also lets you manually adjust the screen orientation in all four directions. Because the LifeBook T4220's vents get quite hot, however, we don't recommend orienting the screen so the vent side rests against your body.

Writing on the LifeBook T4220 was comfortable enough for quickly scribbled notes but not ideal for writing a lengthy document: the stylus lacks heft, and we wish the writing surface offered a little more resistance. We found the stylus responsive, however, and loved the eraser feature on top, which works exactly like a pencil eraser; though the eraser isn't unique to Fujitsu, we consider it a key feature for any tablet stylus. When not using the system in tablet mode, the amply sized keyboard and rectangular touch pad function well, although the keys are somewhat loud. We appreciate that even the heaviest key strokes weren't enough to make the LifeBook T4220's display wobble. We also love the scroll button, located between the laptop's two mouse buttons, which let us coast through long documents and Web pages with ease.

  Fujitsu LifeBook T4220 Average for thin-and-light category
Video VGA-out VGA-out, S-Video
Audio Stereo speakers, headphone/microphone jacks Stereo speakers, headphone/microphone jacks
Data 3 USB 2.0, serial port, multiformat memory card reader, smart card reader 3 USB 2.0, mini-FireWire, multiformat memory card reader
Expansion PC Card PC Card or ExpressCard
Networking modem, Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11 a/g/n Wi-Fi, optional Bluetooth modem, Ethernet, 802.11 a/b/g Wi-Fi, optional Bluetooth, optional WWAN
Optical drive DVD burner DVD burner

The Fujitsu LifeBook T4220 has a more or less average selection of ports and connections for a thin-and-light laptop, though it does lack a mini-FireWire jack. An ExpressCard slot would have been nice as well, especially if you want to add mobile broadband later on (Fujitsu does not offer a built-in WWAN radio, even as an option). We do like the LifeBook T4220's integrated smart card reader, which lets you add a level of security beyond just passwords. And we appreciate the port covers that keep dust and debris out of some (but, strangely, not all) of the laptop's ports. As would be expected on a work-oriented tablet, the LifeBook T4220's stereo speakers produce extremely tinny sound.

As befitting a laptop built on Intel's latest Centrino Duo platform, the $2,249 Fujitsu LifeBook T4220 performed well on CNET Labs' mobile benchmarks. Its performance equaled or exceeded that of the $2,102 Gateway E-265M and the $1,499 Lenovo 3000 V200. One notable exception: the LifeBook T4220 trailed far behind both systems and even a previous-generation Dell XPS M1210 on our Photoshop test. The most likely culprit is the Fujitsu's paltry allotment of RAM--half as much as the competing systems. If you're likely to do resource-intensive tasks beyond Web surfing and pounding out memos, you should consider upgrading to at least 2GB of RAM, which will add $150 to the price.

The Fujitsu LifeBook T4220 lasted an impressive 2 hours, 41 minutes on our resource-intensive DVD drain test; this test is especially grueling, so you can expect longer life from casual Web surfing and office use. The Dell XPS M1210 managed to last longer than the LifeBook T4220, but the Dell also included a much larger battery. The Lenovo 3000 V200 included similar components (with the exception of a slightly slower processor) and lasted only 2 hours, 16 minutes.

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Quick Specifications See All

  • Chipset Type Mobile Intel GM965 Express
  • Installed Size 512 MB
  • CPU Intel Core 2 Duo T7250 / 2 GHz
  • Resolution 1024 x 768 ( XGA )
  • Weight 4.4 lbs
  • Optical Drive CD-RW / DVD-ROM combo - removable
  • Graphics Processor Intel GMA X3100