Flip Ultra (second gen) review: Flip Ultra (second gen)

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CNET Editors' Rating

3 stars Good
  • Overall: 6.6
  • Design: 7.0
  • Features: 6.0
  • Performance: 7.0
  • Image quality: 6.0
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good Decent video for a VGA budget mini camcorder; easy to use; good low-light performance; 4GB memory holds 2 hours of video; FlipShare software is compatible with both Mac and Windows machines.

The Bad No memory card slot; no rechargeable battery included.

The Bottom Line Flip Video has made some modest improvements to the original Ultra--but it's only worth buying at a reasonable discount off its list price.

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Editors' note: You may have heard that Cisco will no longer be producing the Flip camcorder products. However, as long as they're still available on the market, you may want to consider buying one anyway. If so, here are some issues you should consider , and if not, here are some alternatives .

Every six months or so, Flip Video--slated to be absorbed by Cisco by the end of this year--puts out a new model or two of its popular YouTube friendly point-and-shoot mini camcorders. Late last year it was the MinoHD. Now, for spring 2009, it brings us two updated versions of the Ultra: the higher-end model, the UltraHD, shoots 720p (1,280x720) high-definition video, while the less expensive second generation Ultra shoots 640x480 VGA-quality video.

On the outside at least, not much has changed from Flip's first-generation Ultra. But there are a couple of notable differences. For starters, the transflective LCD on the back is bigger, measuring 2 inches, compared with 1.5 inches. The buttons are also bigger and Flip has made a small change to the power on/off button, making it a standard push button rather than a slider.

The UltraHD, which lists for $50 more than the Ultra, comes with a set of NiMH rechargeable batteries that you can charge in the unit by simply connecting the camcorder (via Flip's trademark flip-out USB connector) to the USB port on your computer. However, this model only comes with a set of AA alkalines--no rechargeable solution is provided, which is too bad. Using AA batteries is convenient because you can always carry an extra set around with you as backup, and they're easy to find in stores wherever you might be. But there's one small drawback: AA rechargeable batteries are bulkier and heavier than the slim lithium ion rechargeable batteries that are built into some mini camcorders, including Flip's Mino line. So by default you're getting a bigger, heavier camcorder (the new Ultra weighs in at 5.7 ounces versus 3.3 ounces for the Mino and 5 ounces for the original Ultra). That said, the Ultra is still pocket-friendly--it's just not as pocket-friendly as the others.

The Ultra opts for a simple video out port that displays low-resolution video on your TV. Your basic composite AV cable (the red, white, and yellow plugs) ships with the device, so you don't have to buy any optional accessories. Plus, Flip throws in a thin, soft cover to protect the Ultra's plastic finish (it comes in black, white, yellow, and pink)--just don't count on it protecting the camcorder from high drops.

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About The Author

Executive Editor David Carnoy has been a leading member of CNET's Reviews team since 2000. He covers the gamut of gadgets and is a notable e-reader and e-publishing expert. He's also the author of the novels Knife Music and The Big Exit. Both titles are available as Kindle, iBooks, and Nook e-books.