Eclipse AVN6620 review: Eclipse AVN6620

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CNET Editors' Rating

3.5 stars Very good
  • Overall: 7.6
  • Design: 8.0
  • Features: 8.0
  • Performance: 7.0
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good The Eclipse AVN6620 is loaded with features, including a useful built-in GPS navigation system, digital audio and video playback capabilities, and some advanced acoustic tweaking options.

The Bad Its turn-by-turn guidance is not as accurate as some factory-fitted navigation systems. The need for a clunky iPod module can make installation trickier.

The Bottom Line The Eclipse AVN6620 is a device for those looking to tech out their car with a single device. Its elegant design, wealth of features and expandability, and the fact that it's easy to use make it a strong contender in the all-in-one in-car device market.

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Eclipse delivers an evolutionary, rather than revolutionary, upgrade to its all-in-one in-car navigation and multimedia lineup with the AVN6620. The double-DIN system features a similar design to that of the AVN5510, with a combination of easy-to-use hard buttons on the bezel and a broadly intuitive touch-screen menu structure for control of its built-in GPS navigation and audio and video sources. The former now comes with an expanded points-of-interest (POI) database, building outlines for major urban centers, and optional real-time traffic information. For multimedia, the AVN6620 packs in all that Eclipse has to offer, including support for compressed digital-audio format discs, and add-on support for iPods, Sirius Satellite Radio, HD Radio, and a Parrot Bluetooth hands-free calling interface. The result is a stylish, feature-rich system that performs each of its many functions well.

Design
Squeezing the maximum possible real estate out of a double-DIN system, the AVN6620 features a 7-inch wide-screen, touch-screen display. Along the bottom of the screen, a number of simple backlit hard buttons provide easy access to most of the system's top-line feature menus, including dedicated buttons for navigation and AV menus, as well as a very useful generic Menu button, which gives drivers one-touch access to destination entry, media source, and system settings. One niggle we have with these hard buttons, however, is the relative obscurity of the volume controls, which can be difficult to locate while driving along with one eye on the road.

A major part of the success of the design of the AVN6620 is the way it splits up the programming interface between the hard, bezel-mounted buttons and the "soft" touch-screen buttons. As we observed in our reviews of the AVN6600 and the AVN5510, Eclipse does a good job of making its onscreen menus intuitive and easy for drivers to use while driving along: large, bright, crisply rendered touch-screen buttons make it easy to see options at a glance, while an intelligent menu structure helps users enter destination or select audio tracks without getting lost. Like its predecessor, the AVN6620 features two disc slots behind its drop-down faceplate, giving users the chance to listen to audio discs--or play DVD video through the rear-seat entertainment system--at the same time as using the GPS navigation system. In contrast to the elegantly designed in-dash system, the AVN6620 requires an add-on module to connect iPods: many smaller and cheaper stereos manage to pack in iPod compatibility without the need for a clunky external box, and we would like to have seen a similar thing on Eclipse's systems.

Features and performance
The AVN6610 comes with built-in DVD ROM-based GPS navigation as standard. Maps are provided by Navteq and include building outlines for major urban centers in the United States, as well an updated POI database with 8.3 million entries. On first connecting the device and installing the GPS antenna, we found that the navigation system took longer than expected to find its bearings--around 20 minutes of driving around. Once it did get its satellite fix, the system proved itself to be quite accurate, but not pinpoint-precise, often giving us our current location to within the nearest quarter block.

Destination entry for addresses is extremely straightforward, requiring users simply to key in the street number, street name, and city name via the onscreen keypad. Before entering a destination, users have to configure the map to focus on a specific area of the country, a feature we like as the system is then able to provide a more refined and relevant list of destination options by graying out letters for non-applicable address (on the other side of the country, for example) during the address entry. We also like the five programmable shortcut buttons along the bottom of the destination-entry screen for calling up common locations, as well as the one-touch Home button.

One thing we did find puzzling is the apparent inability of the system to accept points-of-interest categories in the destination entry screen: while drivers can input the specific name of a point of interest (such as "San Francisco Opera House" or "Home Depot"), it is not possible to select enter a POI category (such as "entertainment" or "hardware store") to begin with. In mitigation, the system does allow drivers to search the current map screen for POI categories by pressing the Map button, which gives drivers the option to "Show POI icons" in a chosen category--potentially a more effective way of searching for a POI in the current vicinity than by entering the category name first. Also to our liking is the way that some POI icons for major retail and service chains (such as Chevron, Shell, Home Depot, and Target) show up on the map with specific brand logos.


The AVN6620's expanded points-of-interest database features logos for major retailers.

With a destination entered, the system presents three route options depending on whether you want the shortest or the quickest option (not always the same thing). When under route guidance, the current-location icon kicks its way along in a somewhat jagged motion. Unlike many of the latest factory-fitted navigation systems we have reviewed, the AVN6620 does not feature text-to-speech technology for reading out the names of upcoming roads. Instead, the system relies on a split-screen device, showing a zoomed-in version of the map on the right-hand side of the display, which lists the name of upcoming roads. In practice, we found the navigation system to be usable, but somewhat annoying at times due to its tendency to give premature or oversimplified spoken directions. For example, if we needed to take a right turn followed by a third right turn, the system would simply tell us to expect a "right turn followed by a right turn," more than once causing us to make the second turn too early. While under route guidance, there are a number of useful display options, including one-touch zoom in and zoom out buttons (with a zoom range of 150 feet to 250 miles), a setting to change between north up and current direction up, and a mark button to save the current location for future reference.

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Where to Buy

Eclipse AVN6620

Part Number: AVN-6620
Pricing is currently unavailable.

Quick Specifications See All

  • Additional Features dual-zone capability
  • Type LCD monitor
  • Functions GPS navigation system
  • Media Type DVD
  • Max Output Power / Channel Qty 50 Watts x 4
  • Form Factor in-dash