Dell Inspiron One 2320 review: Dell Inspiron One 2320

The apps are mostly straightforward media players and the like, although Dell has also included the Nero-made SyncUp program for streaming media files between devices on a network. You can drag and drop your own shortcut icons to the Stage bar. In all, Stage is an accessible, unobtrusive approach to touch. It's not quite as produced as HP's similar TouchSmart software, but the overall benefits are similar.

Alongside the media connectors mentioned above, Dell has also included the usual assortment of data connections. You get four USB 2.0 jacks on the rear panel, and on the left side you'll find an SD memory card reader and another pair of USB 2.0 inputs. Also on the left edge, the Inspiron One 2320 offers a set of analog audio jacks and dedicated buttons for screen brightness and volume control. Dell throws in a wireless mouse and keyboard to round out the package. Our only complaint: no USB 3.0 ports. USB 3.0 should be standard in any new all-in-one over $1,000.

Juice box
Dell Inspiron One 2320 Average watts per hour
Off (watts) 0.57
Sleep (watts) 1.39
Idle (watts) 32.9
Load (watts) 83.02
Raw (annual kWh) 140.58924
Energy Star compliant Yes
Annual operating cost (@$0.1135/kWh) $15.96

The Inspiron One 2320 offers few surprises in its power efficiency. You can argue that it overachieves a little given that it draws less power than the slower Samsung Series 7 all-in-one, although only by a narrow margin. And while the Lenovo IdeaCentre B520 is much faster than this Dell, you can also see from our comparison chart that that speed comes with a dramatic increase in power costs.

One other note about this system and its power and thermal efficiency: I received a few e-mails from owners of Dell's Inspiron One 2305 reporting frequent failures because of overheating. While I didn't come across any such issues during the admittedly short review process of that unit, I made a point to watch out for any similar issues on this model. I measure the temperature of the cooling vent on the back panel during a test run of 3DMark 2011, one of the more intensive benchmarks around. During that test, our handheld laser thermometer registered 107 degree peaks in temperature around the vent, with an average probably around 100 degrees or so. We've seen iMacs hit 104 degrees, so that temperature range isn't out of the question for an all-in-one.

Looking further, I ran a program called LinX on the Dell. We use LinX to test the stability of overclocked gaming desktops, and essentially it runs a series of calculations that maxes out the CPU and memory utilization. If the system can't maintain maximum performance due to heat or other issues, LinX will report an error. I left LinX running overnight on the Inspiron One 2320, and found it had successfully completed the test run when I came in the following morning. Your mileage may vary, and stability can change over time with wear, but I can at least report that our review unit passed our stability tests.

Should you need to service the Inspiron One 2320 for overheating or any reason, you'll find Dell's on-paper service and support policies compare well with those of its mainstream competition. You get 24-7 phone support, a yearlong parts-and-labor warranty, a variety of support resources online, and various diagnostic tools on the system itself. Phone support, of course, varies from support rep to support rep.

Conclusion
While I'd like to see faster performance from this system given its competition in the same price range, Dell has overachieved in the variety of connections going into and out of its new Inspiron One 2320 all-in-one. And even if it's not the fastest all-in-one out there for $1,200 or so, its performance is robust enough that you can still feel confident playing games or performing basic digital media editing tasks. I wouldn't recommend this system over the Lenovo IdeaCentre B520 for dedicated gamers, but this Dell is a solid buy for consumers looking for a general purpose all-in-one.

Find out more about how we test desktop systems.

System configurations:

Dell Inspiron One 2320
Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit (SP1); 2.8GHz Intel Core i5 2400s; 8GB 1,333MHz DDR3 SDRAM; 1GB Nvidia GeForce 525M graphics card; 2TB 7,200rpm hard drive

Apple iMac 21.5-inch
Apple OS X Snow Leopard 10.6.7; 2.5GHz Intel Core i5-2400; 4GB 1,333MHz DDR3 SDRAM; 512MB AMD Radeon HD 6750 graphics card; 500GB 7,200rpm hard drive

HP TouchSmart 520
Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit (SP1); 2.5GHz Intel Core i7-2600s; 8GB 1,333MHz DDR3 SDRAM; 1GB AMD Radeon HD 6450A graphics card; 2TB 5,400rpm hard drive

Lenovo Idea Centre B520
Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit (SP1); 3.4GHz Intel Core i7-2600; 8GB 1,333MHz DDR3 SDRAM; 2GB Nvidia GeForce GT 555 graphics card; 2TB 7,200rpm hard drive

Samsung Series 7 All-In-One
Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit (SP1); 2.7GHz Intel Core i5-2390T; 8GB 1,333MHz DDR3 SDRAM; 64MB Intel HD Graphics 1000 embedded graphics; 1TB 7,200rpm hard drive

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    Dell Inspiron One 2320 - Intel Core i7-2600S processor (2.80GHz with 8MB Cache)

    Part Number: FCDOOH38

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    About The Author

    Rich Brown is an executive editor for CNET Reviews. He has worked as a technology journalist since 1994.