D-Link DIR-645 Amplifi Whole Home Router 1000 review: D-Link DIR-645 Amplifi Whole Home Router 1000

If you don't want to opt for an OpenDNS account, you can also manage the router's access to the Internet within the router's Web interface by using its Web-filtering feature. This feature's tools include Network Filter, Access Control, Website Filter, and Inbound Control. These tools allow to you control the network and limit access to the Internet by specific criteria, such as preventing a particular computer from accessing an adult Web site or only allowing it to run instant messenger programs during a certain period of time. When hosting an external hard drive, the router can also work as a streaming server, making digital content, including music, photos, and videos, stored on the connected hard drive available to network DLNA-compliant media streamers and iTunes. You can also share documents with multiple computers the way you do with NAS servers. You can't restrict access the hard drive, however, meaning that everyone will have full read and write access to all data stored on the hard drive.

Similar to D-Link's USB-equipped routers, the DIR-645's USB port works with the included SharePort utility software to support any USB device. The software allows the computer to recognize a USB device plugged into the router as if it were plugged directly into the computer's USB port. This is a nifty feature that spares you from having to move the device around since most USB devices are generally designed to work with the only the computer it's plugged in. With certain USB devices, such as a printer or external hard drive, SharePort Plus even allows multiple computers to access the connected USB device at the same time.

The DIR-645 also has an easily customizable QoS feature that helps you prioritize your Internet and network traffic for different services. This is especially helpful for gamers or those who use VoIP services, such as Internet-based phone or video conferencing.

Generally, like with most D-Link routers, I love the way the DIR-645 Web interface is organized and functions. While it's not sleek, it's very clear and intuitive and helps savvy users to quickly set up and customize advanced networking features with ease.

Performance
The DIR-645 offered very good range in my testing, up to around 300 feet away at CNET's test facility, which is not exactly optimized for range. Needless to say, it's better to use the router within a shorter range if you want better throughput performance and minimized lag time. In my testing, the router offered its best at 150 feet or less. Further, it's only good for casual Internet surfing.

The reason is because it operates only in the 2.4Ghz band, which is very popular and tends to be interfered with by other networks and other devices, such as Bluetooth or even cordless phones. In my testing, the DIR-645 offered peak throughput speed of around 60Mbps at a close 15-foot range. When I increased the distance to 100 feet, this dropped to about 40Mbps. These numbers weren't the best but generally above average among single-band routers that I've reviewed.

While the router's throughput performance was within my expectations, its signal stability wasn't the best. When set in N-only mode, which means the router works at its top speed but allows only 802.11n wireless clients to connect to it, forgoing all other legacy clients, it would disconnect after 6 to 8 hours of heavy operation. In this case, sometimes I needed to restart the router to get connected again. However, when set to work in mixed mode, supporting all N and legacy clients, its stability was much better and it was able to pass the 24-hour stress test without any hiccups. Hopefully this will be fixed via new firmware. Note that by default the router is set to work in mixed mode, so most home users will be unlikely to run into the issue with the N-only mode that I experienced.

Since the router can work as a simple NAS server when coupled with an external hard drive, I tried this feature out and found the performance, via a Gigabit network connection, comparable to that of other routers with built-in network storage capability. It averaged about 6MBps for both writing and reading, fast enough for light document sharing and media streaming. If you want to stream high-def content, it's recommended that you get a dedicated NAS server.

2.4Ghz Wireless-N performance (in megabits per second)
(Longer bars indicate better performance)
Range  
Throughput  
Cisco Linksys E2000
51.3 
74.2 
Cisco RV110W
28.4 
62.6 
Cisco Linksys E1500
37.4 
62 
Cisco Linksys E4200
46.9 
61.4 
D-Link DIR-657
39.2 
60 
D-Link DIR-825
40.4 
57.44 
Belkin N+ Wireless Router
29.44 
55.44 
Netgear WNDR3700
38.6 
54.8 
Lacie Wireless Space
19.8 
53.4 
D-Link DIR-645
24.5 
51.3 
D-Link DIR-655
38.4 
50.6 
Cisco Linksys E3000
32.8 
43.5 
Linksys WRT610n
28.8 
35.76 
Apple Time Capsule
20.8 
32.2 

Service and support
Similar to the DIR-657 and DIR-655, D-Link backs the DIR-645 with a one-year warranty, which is short but standard for most home routers. At the company's Web site, you will find a wealth of support information including downloads, FAQs, and a searchable knowledge base. You can also seek help through the company's toll-free technical support phone line, which is available 24-7.

Conclusion
The D-Link Amplifi Whole Home Router 1000 DIR-645 could make an excellent router if its signal stability were better in N-only mode. At its current state, it's still a very good router for homes that need a fast wired network, good set of networking features, and excellent Wi-Fi coverage.

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Quick Specifications See All

  • Weight 11.2 oz
  • Data Transfer Rate 300 Mbps
  • Connectivity Technology wireless