Clingo Universal Car Phone Mount review: This phone mount needs a bath

With its paddle mechanism, it was easy to attach the suction cup firmly to a car windshield. When I drove over rough roads, the suction cup held without a problem, while the hinge and ball joint also maintained their positions without slipping.

Clingo Universal Car Phone Mount
The Clingo Universal Car Phone Mount uses an adhesive pad to hold a smartphone in place. Wayne Cunningham/CNET

The adhesive pad did not work as well. Fresh from the box, the pad held a smartphone in place very well. After I removed the phone, there was no residue or any stickiness left on the phone's back, as advertised. Over a couple of weeks, the adhesive material began to feel less sticky, although pushing a phone against it still resulted in a firm-feeling hold.

When road-tested fresh out of the box, the mount held a phone firmly in place over many miles of driving. Retested after a couple of weeks, it initially held during a road test, but then the phone dropped off after just a few miles.

During the time we tested the Clingo Universal Car Phone Mount, it seemed that the adhesive pad became dirty, and lost some of its stickiness. Clingo advises simply washing it with warm water. After giving our mount a bath, I found the adhesion was restored.

The Clingo Universal Car Phone Mount initially appeared to be an excellent way to mount a smartphone in a car. It allowed good positioning for visibility and access, and it was easy to attach and detach the phone. However, the fact that the adhesive pad needs frequent washing makes it substantially less convenient, as most people probably would be loath to pull it out of the car every month to clean it.

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Clingo Universal Car Phone Mount

Part Number: CNET30272
MSRP: $34.99 Low Price: $8.00 See all prices

Quick Specifications See All

  • CE Product Type cellular phone holder for car
About The Author

Wayne Cunningham reviews cars and writes about automotive technology for CNET. Prior to the Car Tech beat, he covered spyware, Web building technologies, and computer hardware. He began covering technology and the Web in 1994 as an editor of The Net magazine. He's also the author of "Vaporware," a novel that's available as a Nook e-book.