Clickfree C2N review: Clickfree C2N

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CNET Editors' Rating

4 stars Excellent
  • Overall: 8.0
  • Design: 9.0
  • Features: 7.0
  • Performance: 9.0
  • Service and support: 5.0
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good The Clickfree C2N offers a convenient way to backup computers within a network. It's fast, compact, good-looking and includes a docking station.

The Bad The Clickfree C2N doesn't allow you to back up the entire computer as an image, and it doesn't support USB 3.0, FireWire, or eSATA.

The Bottom Line The Clickfree C2N makes an excellent backup solution for home users, including those with multiple network computers.

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Announced at CES 2010, the Clickfree C2N is the upgrade to the Clickfree Portable Backup Drive with an added function that supports network computers. That said, apart from making backing up a local computer a no-brainer, the device now backs up other networked computers without requiring a direct USB connection. While the Clickfree C2N lacks support for the much-faster USB 3.0 standard and doesn't offer system image backup, it makes up for it by offering a very fast USB 2.0 connection performance.

At street prices of around $120, $130, and $150 for the 250GB, 320GB, and 500GB versions, respectively, the Clickfree C2N is an easy recommendation for any home user who wants to back up their computers without having to get very involved in the process.

Design
Out of the box, the Clickfree C2N drive is good-looking and compact, measuring just 4.52 inches by 2.9 inches by 0.67 inch and weighing a mere 0.38 pound.

Drive type External USB Hard Drive
Connector options USB 2.0
Available capacities 250GB, 320GB, 500GB
Intel-Mac OS 10.5 or later 4.52x0.67x2.9 inches
Capacity of test unit 500GB
OSes supported Windows 2000, XP, Vista, 7, Mac OS 10.5 or later
Software included Clickfree Backup software

The Clickfree C2N has a docking station that features an attached Y-shaped USB cable with two USB connectors on it. Since the drive is bus-powered and draws power from the USB port, a second connector is needed in case a single USB port doesn't provide enough juice to power the hard drive. Together with the docking station, the Clickfree C2N looks good on a desk.

The C2N drive doesn't, however, require the docking station to work. In addition to the mini-USB port on its bottom that connects to the docking station or any other mini-USB cable, the drive has another short, built-in USB cable that can be completely tucked away in a groove on its back. We tried the drive with many computers, and all of them can power the drive via a single USB port.

The Clickfree C2N is preconfigured with two partitions. One is formatted using the NTFS file system to store data, and the other is a read-only CD-ROM emulated partition that contains the ClickFree Backup software. You can do whatever you want with the first partition, including reformatting it to support Mac OS, but you can't make changes to the second one.

There's really nothing to setting up the device. The first time you plug it into a PC computer, the Clickfree Backup software will prompt you to launch it. For security reasons, you'll need to allow it to run. Once launched, you'll be greeted with a 30-second countdown before the software begins the first backup with its default settings. You can skip this countdown by clicking on "Start" or "Options" to further customize the way the software performs the backing up. Subsequent launches will give you the option to perform a restoration or view the backups that have been made.

We tried the Clickfree Backup software with Windows-based computers, but the software also works similarly with Intel-based Macs as long as they run OS 10.5 or later.

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Where to Buy

Clickfree C2N (320GB)

Part Number: 327NCR-1004-100

Pricing is currently unavailable.

Quick Specifications See All

  • Interface Type USB
  • Capacity 320 GB
  • Hard Drive Type external hard drive
About The Author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews networking and storage products, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.