Buffalo DriveStation DDR review: Simple, affordable, and unbelievably fast

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CNET Editors' Rating

4.5 stars Outstanding
  • Overall: 8.7
  • Setup and ease of use: 8.0
  • Performance: 10.0
  • Service and support: 8.0
  • Features: 9.0

Average User Rating

1 stars 2 user reviews
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good The USB 3.0-based single-volume Buffalo DriveStation DDR external hard drive offers unprecedentedly superfast speeds -- even faster than high-end Thunderbolt storage devices -- at the same cost as most regular USB 3.0 storage devices.

The Bad As a single-volume drive, the Buffalo DriveStation DDR offers no options for data protection should its only internal hard drive fail.

The Bottom Line The Buffalo DriveStation DDR is by far the fastest single-volume external drive on the market and makes USB 3.0 a true alternative storage connection to Thunderbolt.

CNET Editors' Choice May '13

Editors' Top Picks

Editors' note: After final testing, I decided to give the Editors' Choice Award to the Buffalo DriveStation DDR for its outstanding performance and affordable pricing. Still, note that this is a single-volume device and as such is not suitable for storing the only copy of your important data.

Once in a while, there's a revolutionary product that changes the conventional expectations for the entire class of devices, and among all USB 3.0-based external hard drives, the Buffalo DriveStation DDR is that product.

Housing a standard 3.5-inch hard drive on the inside, the new external storage device is the first that incorporates 1GB of DDR3 memory as cache to boost the data speeds. In my testing, the DriveStation DDR's USB 3.0 real-world speeds trumped even those of the most advanced Thunderbolt storage systems. It's just ridiculously fast.

If you're looking to get an external hard drive for a desktop that supports USB 3.0, the Buffalo DriveStation DDR is definitely an excellent buy. Maybe you should even get two for backup purposes since the drive is slated to cost just $140 and $180 for 2TB and 3TB, respectively.

The Buffalo DriveStation DDR looks very much like any USB 3.0 desktop external hard drive.
The Buffalo DriveStation DDR looks very much like any USB 3.0 desktop external hard drive. Dong Ngo/CNET

Design
The Buffalo DriveStation DDR is a relatively compact box that houses a single 3.5-inch standard hard drive on the inside. Its internal hard drive is not user-replaceable, which is quite normal for this type of storage device. It requires a separate power adapter to work.

The Buffalo DriveStation DDR comes with a few utilities that enhance the user experience.
The Buffalo DriveStation DDR comes with a few utilities that enhance the user experience. Screenshot by Dong Ngo/CNET

On the back, it has a standard Micro-USB 3.0 port, the power connector, and a small opening that looks like that of ventilation a fan, but there's no actual fan. On the front, there are two small indicator lights for the power status and data activities.

The DriveStation must be plugged into both power and a host computer via a USB cable (included) to work.

The Buffalo DriveStation DDR is the first that comes with 1GB of DDR3 memory -- similar to the system memory used in a computer -- to be used as cache for its read and write operations. This amount of memory is designed to be the buffer to ensure the drive offers optimum data transfer speeds, especially when the data includes many files that are smaller than 1TB. The only drawback to this design is that when the drive is unplugged from its power source during a data transfer, you'll lose more information that's being written to the drive, than when using a conventional drive. This is not a big problem, however, since it doesn't affect the original copy of the data.

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Quick Specifications

  • Release date May. 6, 2013
About The Author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews networking and storage products, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.