BlueLounge Cool Feet review: BlueLounge Cool Feet

CNET Editors' Rating

3 stars Good
  • Overall: 6.0
  • Design: 6.0
  • Features: 6.0
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good Small, light, and easy to carry.

The Bad Unimpressive cooling; more suited for tabletops than laps.

The Bottom Line BlueLounge's Cool Feet are better for your laptop's ergonomics than for cooling, this limits their usefulness.

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BlueLounge Cool Feet

Overheated laptops are a simple fact of life for many users, leading to unstable systems, performance problems, and the occasional singed hand or thigh. There are various cooling solutions on the market, but most are bulky or inconvenient, from cutting-board-size laptop desks to externally powered fan contraptions. These larger devices are useful, but if you want to carry around a minimum of extra equipment, the smallest cooling solution we've seen is BlueLounge's Cool Feet. For $13, you get a set of four rubber legs that prop up your laptop at a slight angle, allowing for more airflow under the machine. It may seem like a lot for a simple set of rubber risers, but if you're looking for an improved airflow solution that fits in your pocket and gives your laptop a more ergonomically agreeable angle, the Cool Feet aren't as ridiculous as they may seem at first glance.

The set includes four rubber feet with suction cups, a set of adhesive circles for the feet to attach to, and a small drawstring carrying bag. Two of the feet measure 1.25 inches in height, while the other two are only 0.5 inch high. By putting the bigger feet at the back of the laptop and the smaller feet at the front, you create a gentle angle for the laptop, which is a more comfortable typing position for many people.

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Where to Buy

BlueLounge Cool Feet

Part Number: Cool Feet Released: Dec. 1, 2006

Pricing is currently unavailable.

Quick Specifications

  • Release date Dec. 1, 2006
About The Author

Dan Ackerman leads CNET's coverage of laptops, desktops, and Windows tablets, while also writing about games, gadgets, and other topics. A former radio DJ and member of Mensa, he's written about music and technology for more than 15 years, appearing in publications including Spin, Blender, and Men's Journal.