Asus VH236H review: Asus VH236H

The VH236H achieved a brightness score of 283 candelas per square meter (cd/m2)--just a few points shy of Asus's claimed 300 cd/m2 max. The Samsung SyncMaster P2370 achieved a lower brightness with 239 cd/m2, but was right under Samsung's 250 cd/m2 max. On our dark-screen test, both monitors exhibited significant backlight bleedthrough on the top and bottom edges of the displays, but the Asus performed slightly better.

Our "Kill Bill Vol. 1" DVD test yielded minimal ghosting on the Asus, thanks to its dark blacks when in Theater Mode, which makes the ghosting difficult to see. Conversely, the Samsung's movie mode looked light in comparison with much shallower blacks. Also, the colors on the Asus seemed to pop a lot better than the Samsung.

Unreal Tournament 3 looked great running at 1,920x1,080 pixels. Although the Asus' color had the most pop, neither the VH236H nor the P2370 were able to display the game as vibrantly and colorfully as the Acer G24 . Yet, I think we're spoiled by that monitor's game performance.

The optimal viewing angle for a monitor is usually directly in front, about a quarter of the screen's distance down from the top. At this angle, you're viewing the colors and gamma correction as they were intended. Since most monitors are made to be viewed only at that angle type, picture quality at nonoptimal angles varies depending on the monitor. Like most monitors, the Asus VH236H uses a TN panel, which gets overly bright or overly dark when viewed from nonoptimal angles. When we viewed the Asus from the sides or below, the screen appeared to darken only a couple inches from optimal. From the sides and below, text is still readable until viewing from about 70 degrees. Of course, when viewed from the optimal angle, we had no problems.

In the power consumption tests, the Asus VH236H drew a significant 39.58 watts in its Default/On mode--compared with the Samsung SyncMaster P2370's lower, 29.44 watts. Where the Asus really ate up the juice was in its standby mode, which drew 2.7 watts compared with the P2370's 0.85 watts--more than three times the difference. Based on our formula, the VH236H would cost $13.68 per year to run, compared with the P2370's $9.37 per year.

In audio tests, sound from the built-in speakers was muffled, but we reached the maximum volume easily without any noticeable distortion. Sound from the headphones was good, but the max volume was not quite as high as we'd like.

Brightness in cd/m2
(Longer bars indicate better performance)

Juice box
Asus VH236H Picture settings
39.58
On (Max Luminance) 40.95
On (Min Luminance) 23.06
Sleep 2.7
Calibrated (200 cd/ M2) 32.06
Annual Energy Cost $13.60
Score Poor

Find out more about how we test LCD monitors

Service and support
Asus backs the VH236H with a three-year parts-and-labor warranty that covers the backlight. It also offers support through a 24-7 toll-free number, e-mail, and Web chat. Documentation and support software are easily accessible for the VH236H on Asus' Web site.

Editors' Top Picks

 

ARTICLE DISCUSSION

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Quick Specifications See All

  • Display Type LCD monitor / TFT active matrix
  • Interface VGA (HD-15)
  • Diagonal Size 23 in
  • Pixel Pitch 0.266 mm
  • Image Aspect Ratio 16:9
About The Author

Eric Franklin is a section editor covering how to and tablets. He's also co-host of CNET's do-it-yourself and how-to show, The Fix and is a 20-year tech industry veteran.