Archos 70 review: Archos 70

Features
As far as software goes, you're looking at an Android 2.2 device, minus the conveniences of Google's proprietary apps, including Android Marketplace, Gmail, and Maps. You get the stock Android 2.2 e-mail app and Web browser, along with Archos' remixed versions of the Android music player, photo viewer, and video player.

As a peace gesture, Archos offers its own app store called AppsLib, for those looking to go through the motions. As we've noted in previous Archos tablet reviews, the content just isn't there. It's like taking a trip through a flea market. There are plenty of knockoffs and hastily produced games and demos, but the brand names aren't around.

What's more interesting are the hardware features. The Archos 70 doesn't offer cellular connections or GPS, but you do get 802.11n Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth. There's also a Mini-HDMI port that mirrors the onscreen view to a TV--perfect for playing videos or showing off Web sites.

Of course, not all of the specs are winners. The included front-facing VGA camera isn't flattering to anyone. It can shoot stills or video, but its biggest asset is compatibility with video chat apps, such as Fring (an optional free download).

Another disappointment is the lack of full Adobe Flash 10 support. It's a complaint we make about tablets twice the price of the Archos 70--but regardless of the bargain you think you're getting, it's frustrating to come across broken Flash players while browsing the Web.

Performance
In many ways, the Archos 70 is one of the best-performing budget tablets on the market. It sports a 1GHz ARM Cortex A8 processor (clocked down to 800MHz by default) and 3D OpenGL ES 2.0 graphic acceleration for improved gaming performance. Despite the power under the hood, it's not as swift as the Samsung Galaxy Tab when it comes to touch-screen responsiveness, wake time, or screen reorientation. The culprit is likely a skimping on system RAM, but whatever the reason, it can't hold a candle to the Galaxy Tab or Dell Streak 7 when it comes to general responsiveness and app load time.

On a good note, the Archos 70 continues the company's legacy of excellent media format support. On the video end you have file support for AVI, MP4, MKV, MOV, WMV, MPG, PS, TS, VOB, and FLV, many up to 720p at 30fps. Of course, all that resolution is lost on the tablet's 800x480 screen, but there's always the Mini-HDMI output.

One of the indisputable killer specs for Archos is the option of a 250GB hard-drive model. The basic 8GB version is fine if you plan on supplying your own storage via microSD, but media hoarders looking to turn the Archos 70 into a portable HD video drive to connect to their TVs will likely want to step up to the hard-drive model.

We tested the Archos 70's battery life at full screen with a 720p video. See below for results.

Video battery life (in hours) Maximum brightness (in cd/m2) Default brightness (in cd/m2) Contrast ratio
Archos 70 4.7 302 216 581:1

Final thoughts
Priced less than $300, the Archos 70 delivers an impressive amount of horsepower and features for your money. It's still pretty sluggish, though, and as older, high-end, Android Market-endowed 7-inch tablets get their prices slashed, you'll get more mileage out of an older Galaxy Tab or Dell Streak 7. With the future of Android tablets clearly tied to Google's Android Honeycomb OS, the best advice we can give shoppers looking for the latest and greatest is to wait until the Honeycomb competition heats up later in 2011.

Editors' Top PicksSee All

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Where to Buy See all prices

Archos 70 (8GB)

Part Number: 501582 Released: Dec 1, 2010
MSRP: $274.99 Low Price: $129.99 See all prices

Quick Specifications See All

  • Release date Dec 1, 2010
  • Wireless Connectivity IEEE 802.11b
  • Type Android 2.1
  • Weight 11 oz