Apple Bluetooth Wireless Mighty Mouse review: Apple Bluetooth Wireless Mighty Mouse

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CNET Editors' Rating

3 stars Good
  • Overall: 6.6
  • Design: 7.0
  • Features: 6.0
  • Service and support: 6.0
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good Bluetooth wireless connectivity (even works in Windows, with Boot Camp); batteries lend welcome heft; ease to install and set up.

The Bad Side buttons lack sufficient tactile feedback and require too much pressure; doesn't work with standard Windows-based PCs (at least, not easily).

The Bottom Line Apple's new wireless Mighty Mouse cuts the cord, giving you the freedom of untethered mousing. The design isn't perfect, and Apple isn't shy about the price, but Mac desktops and laptops beg for as little clutter around them as possible, and for that, the Mighty Mouse delivers.

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We suspect that for many of you, the simple fact that Apple's Mighty Mouse has shed its cord will be reason enough to buy it. You won't care that your mouse now requires batteries, nor will you balk at its $69 price tag. And you probably won't find the new laser sensor that big a selling point. Macs call out for wireless peripherals, however, for reasons of both form and function. Plus, who wants to carry a corded mouse around when you're on the road with a laptop? We wish Apple had gone the extra mile and fixed some issues that linger from the original corded model, but our gripes don't amount to enough to prevent a recommendation. It doesn't revolutionize mice, but simply because it's now wireless, Apple's Mighty Mouse will be hard for Mac users to resist.

The Mighty Mouse uses Bluetooth wireless technology to connect to your computer. All new iMacs, Mac Minis, MacBooks, and MacBook Pros come equipped with a Bluetooth receiver built in. We had no trouble connecting the mouse to a Bluetooth-equipped iMac G5, and it worked equally well with our MacBook Pro. As long as your Mac OS X is updated to the latest version (10.4.6), you shouldn't have any problems. Simply install the software, reboot, turn the mouse on, and you're set.

The configuration software is basically the same as the old model's, with only minor layout tweaking. It lets you set the sensitivity of the main left and right buttons, the so-called 360-degree, multidirectional scrollwheel, the left- and right-side buttons, and the laser tracker itself. One of the claimed advantages of the laser sensor is that it's supposed to let you use Mighty Mouse on a wider variety of surfaces than the LED-based original, thanks to the laser's ability to read more surface detail. We tried various surfaces, including a translucent piece of black plastic (both passed), the reflective underside of a DVD (both failed), and a piece of clear plastic (both passed), and neither mouse outperformed the other. The laser's superiority might simply depend on finding the right material to show it off. Maybe you'll have better luck. For the rest of the design, we wish that the left- and right-side buttons didn't require so much pressure to engage and, perhaps, that they had some more pronounced tactile feedback to let you know when you have. Otherwise, once the buttons and cursor speed are set to your preference, using the Mighty Mouse feels as smooth as any day-to-day mouse should.

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Where to Buy See all prices

Apple Bluetooth Wireless Mighty Mouse

Part Number: MB111LL/A Released: Jul. 25, 2006
MSRP: $69.00 Low Price: $69.99 See all prices

Quick Specifications See All

  • Release date Jul. 25, 2006
  • OS Required Apple MacOS X 10.4.8 or later
  • Type mouse
  • Movement Detection Technology laser
  • Connectivity Technology wireless
  • Form Factor AA type
  • Compatibility Mac