Aluratek Internet Radio Alarm Clock with Built in WiFi review: Aluratek Internet Radio Alarm Clock with Built in WiFi

The Aluratek gets streaming audio from the Internet via your home's broadband connection. The Radio has a built-in 802.11g, but it'll also interface with slower 802.11b and faster 802.11n Wi-Fi wireless networks. There's a single Wi-Fi antenna in the back, which can be rotated and is user replaceable. It's compatible with both WEP and WPA security, and we had no problem logging into our WPA network. You can also opt for a wired Ethernet connection, if Wi-Fi proves to be too unstable. For all its functionality, one noticeably missing feature is the capability to add Internet radio stations that aren't available in the preloaded list. While most people will probably find something they like out of the available options, it's always nice to be able to fill in the gaps. It also would be nice to be able to dial into a podcast's RSS feed, so you could, for example, listen to episodes of Radio Lab without downloading them to your computer first.

In addition to streaming Internet radio stations, you can also dial into your own digital music collection. There are two ways to do this: you can connect an USB flash drive to the front USB port or you can connect to a PC running a media server. We had no trouble listening to MP3s off of a thumbdrive, and we were surprised that streaming music off a PC worked without a hitch. Compared with our experiences streaming music in the past, we were pleased at how easily it worked.

It's easy to get sidetracked by all the digital audio functionality, but the Aluratek is a fully functional alarm clock. It has dual alarm functionality, so you can set different "his and hers" wake-up times. Some might be annoyed that setting the alarm is done on the 24-hour standard (military time)--even if you set the clock to be on a 12-hour system--but we didn't mind since we almost always set an a.m. wakeup time, and therefore never had to input a time like 14:30. Another perk is that you can set the alarm to play essentially any music source. Want to wake up to an MP3 off of a flash drive? No problem. Same for Internet radio, FM radio, and even tracks off your networked PC. And you can specify the alarm volume, so you can fall asleep at a quiet volume but have the alarm--whatever the source--be loud enough to wake you from a deep slumber.


There are a healthy amount of jacks on the back, but unfortunately there is no auxiliary input.

The Aluratek has a good deal of connectivity for an alarm clock. There is the USB port for listening to MP3s on the front of the unit. Around back, there's a headphone jack for private listening, stereo analog outputs for connecting to a stereo system, and an Ethernet jack if you want a wired network connection. While the connectivity options are mostly solid, we felt the Aluratek should have included an auxiliary input, which would add the capability to connect an MP3 player or other external audio source.

Performance
How well a Wi-Fi radio is able to pull in a signal and hold it without dropouts and buffering is one of its most important attributes. Luckily, the Aluratek fared fairly well in our real-world testing conditions. As with all Wi-Fi radios, it takes a few seconds to tune into a station (as the radio buffers), but after that we never had the Aluratek rebuffer the signal. Dropped connections were also infrequent, but they did occasionally happen, and we generally had to turn the radio off and on again to regain a signal. It's an infrequent nuisance--and anyone expecting the rock-solid reliability of a stationary AM/FM will be letdown--but it wasn't a major frustration for us.

In terms of sound quality, there's no getting past the fact that the Aluratek sounds like a clock radio. If sound quality is a priority for you, you're probably be better off with a different Wi-Fi radio, such as the Grace Internet Wireless Radio or the Sony VGF-WA1. That said, the Aluratek's sound quality is perfectly acceptable given the lowered expectations. We tuned into a variety of stations--ranging from jazz to rock to classical--and the Aluratek generally sounded decent no matter what we threw at it. There's virtually no bass and the sound is anything but detailed, but uncritical listeners won't mind. We did run into a couple of rough patches. In one instance, we were listening to some talk radio, which sounded fine at about half volume, but started to sound pretty harsh when we cranked the volume higher. We ran into the same thing on some harder rock songs--it sounded decent at moderate levels, but once we pushed the volume close to maximum, we could hear some buzzing that is typical of an overdriven, low-cost audio system. As long as you're not trying to fill your room with sound, you'll be all right.

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    Aluratek Internet Radio Alarm Clock with Built in WiFi

    Part Number: AIRMM01 Released: May 1, 2008
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    Quick Specifications

    • Release date May 1, 2008