Wallet-friendly big-screen Android comes with extras (hands-on)

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February 25, 2013 12:00 AM PST / Updated: February 25, 2013 7:30 AM PST
Alcatel One Touch Scribe Easy
Alcatel introduced the One Touch Scribe Easy at MWC 2013. Jessica Dolcourt/CNET

BARCELONA, Spain--Do you remember the Alcatel One Touch Scribe X from CES last month? Well, the Alcatel One Touch Scribe Easy is a lot like it, but less tailored in appearance and more midrange in specs.

The Scribe Easy's main premise is that's it an extremely affordable Android 4.1 device (4.2 at launch) that comes with a cool magnetic cover and a stylus you can use to transcribe handwriting into text in several custom apps.

For the roughly $130 U.S. full retail price, the specs are fine: a large, 5-inch, 800x480-pixel screen, a 1.2GHz dual-core processor, and a 5-megapixel camera.

I love that you can tuck the stylus into a loop in the magnetic cover, but the handset design is another matter. The Scribe Easy's wide profile fit awkwardly in my hands, and its grooved sides scooped in, so that I was painfully aware of the rim around the screen pressing into my palm.

Although it may not be the sexiest device around, I'm guessing that the wallet-friendly price and included accessories will get people considering the Scribe Easy as their next device, though I'm also guessing that the round rather than pointy stylus tip will turn some people off.

Already available for sale in China under the TCL brand, the Scribe Easy comes to Russia first in March, followed by other markets.

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Where to Buy

Alcatel OneTouch Scribe Easy

Part Number: ONETOUCHSCRIBEEASYULK

MSRP: $130.00

See manufacturer website for availability.

Quick Specifications See All

  • Weight 5.64 oz
  • Diagonal Size 5 in
About The Author

Jessica Dolcourt reviews smartphones and cell phones, covers handset news, and pens the monthly column Smartphones Unlocked. A senior editor, she started at CNET in 2006 and spent four years reviewing mobile and desktop software before taking on devices.