Acronis True Image 9 review: Acronis True Image 9

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CNET Editors' Rating

3 stars Good
  • Overall: 6.5
  • Design: 6.0
  • Features: 7.0
  • Performance: 7.0
  • Service and support: 6.0
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good Acronis True Image 9 creates complete disk-image and folder-based backups and offers a variety of ways to restore an image after a disk disaster.

The Bad Without free phone tech support and encryption, Acronis True Image 9 lacks some of the right stuff.

The Bottom Line Acronis True Image 9 offers powerful tools for backing up your hard drive, so you can quickly recover from any type of disk disaster.

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Acronis True Image 9

Last year's Editors' Choice winner, Acronis True Image, gained the technological lead in disk-imaging technology. Briefly, it lets you create exact copies of your hard drive, whether to another hard drive or to removable media, while continuing to work on the drive you're backing up. The latest version of True Image continues to innovate. One new feature is file-based backup, for targeted backup projects; another is Snap Restore, which lets you start working with a disk even before it's fully restored. But in terms of usability, Acronis True Image 9 falls behind its bitter rival, Norton Ghost 10 . Its tools, while equally powerful, take more time to master and require more hands-on maintenance. Power users and those who have already mastered Acronis True Image should upgrade; they will welcome the new features in this fast and efficient application for protecting data. But beginners are better off with Norton Ghost 10, which completely automates the backup process, making it easy for anyone to create, update, and keep track of disk images.

Acronis True Image 9 installs easily. Upon launch, it greets you with a cleanly laid out screen displaying icons for all the program's features. Click an icon, and a helpful wizard pops up to guide you through whichever function you wish to perform; however, someone new to disk imaging might be bewildered by the various functions--for instance, the distinction between an incremental and a differential backup, or what it means to plug in or unplug a disk image. In some cases, you may need to carefully read the explanations in the wizard to clear up any confusion.




Acronis True Image 9 provides a cleanly laid out console, and attractive icons make it easy to navigate its many functions.

To combat desktop clutter, Acronis True Image 9 doesn't install an icon in your system tray. Instead, it relies on Windows' built-in task scheduler to automate backups. Simply follow the wizard; you can have True Image make backups daily, weekly, or whenever a specified event occurs, such as a system shutdown. The main control console displays a list of scheduled backups.

When it comes to managing backups you've already created, Acronis True Image 9 has fallen behind its rival, Norton Ghost 10. With Acronis True Image 9, you still need to locate backups via filename--a potentially confusing process if you create daily backups of your system and manually delete old ones to free up space on your backup drive. Norton Ghost 10 displays your backups in a more user-friendly interface and can automatically delete old ones based on criteria you specify.

Acronis True Image 9 offers power users a host of features they won't find in other disk-imaging utilities, including Norton Ghost 10. For one, it lets you create a so-called SecureZone, backing up an image to a hidden drive partition, making it inaccessible to viruses and most hackers. Another feature, the Startup Recovery Manager, lets you configure your system so that it can boot up and restore itself without a separate boot disk.




New in Acronis True Image 9 is the ability to back up specific files or folders rather than the complete hard disk.

The biggest new feature in Acronis True Image 9 is the ability to back up specific files and folders. Though this may seem like an odd feature for a product that specializes in backing up entire drives, it's actually very useful. You may want to create archival backups of certain folders or off-site backups of particularly important data. In such situations, backing up files to removable media, such as a DVD-R or CD-R disc, is ideal. Acronis True Image 9 supports file-type exclusions, letting you back up a disk and leave out certain file types; however, it doesn't let you affirmatively specify types to back up--you can't, for instance, tell True Image to back up all your Office DOC, XLS, and PPT documents regardless of their location on the drive.

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Where to Buy

Acronis True Image 9

Part Number: ATI9 Released: Sep 20, 2005
Pricing is currently unavailable.

Quick Specifications See All

  • Release date Sep 20, 2005
  • Category utilities
  • Compatibility PC