Acer Veriton 5200D (Pentium 4 1.7 GHz review: Acer Veriton 5200D (Pentium 4 1.7 GHz

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CNET Editors' Rating

3.5 stars Very good
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good Excellent warranty and support; room to expand; multimedia keyboard.

The Bad Poor performance; loud CD-ROM drive; monitor fuzzy at higher resolutions; no speakers.

The Bottom Line With pack-trailing performance and underwhelming features, the Veriton 5200D-N1700A pales in comparison to other corporate-minded systems we've seen.

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From carton to cubicle in minutes--that's the secret wish of every IT staffer who has to deploy 100, 50, or even just 20 systems. The Acer Veriton 5200D-N1700A, a no-frills workstation aimed squarely at the corporate market, is simple to install and more expandable than the competition. Unfortunately, its lackluster performance and peripherals make it a choice full of compromises. From carton to cubicle in minutes--that's the secret wish of every IT staffer who has to deploy 100, 50, or even just 20 systems. The Acer Veriton 5200D-N1700A, a no-frills workstation aimed squarely at the corporate market, is simple to install and more expandable than the competition. Unfortunately, its lackluster performance and peripherals make it a choice full of compromises.

Elbowroom
The Veriton's beige and blue case recalls the Baby AT style of yesteryear, though it's not quite small enough to qualify as a true compact PC. The Veriton is designed to sit on a desk beneath a monitor, or it can stand sideways like a tower. A pair of captive thumbscrews allow for easy access to the interior. IT departments and desktop users who feel constrained by the near lack of expandability in true compact desktops such as the cheaper Compaq Evo D500 or the more powerful HP e-PC 42 will appreciate the extra elbowroom in the Veriton; three PCI slots, one memory socket, and one drive bay are free. Rear expansion ports are basic: parallel, two serial, and two USB, the last of which are occupied by the keyboard and the Logitech optical mouse. Two additional USB ports adorn the front of the case alongside headphone and microphone jacks.

Acer skimps a bit on the peripherals that come with the Veriton. The AC701 monitor offers sharp text and a bright picture at 800x600, but with the resolution cranked up to 1,024x768, images and text become noticeably fuzzy--and that's at a resolution far short of the monitor's max of 1,280x1,024. In addition to quick-launch and CD-playback buttons, the multimedia keyboard sports a terrific volume-control dial that doubles as a Mute button. Too bad there's no volume to control; no speakers come with the system. Also, the Mute button won't work on the 52X CD-ROM drive, which (typical for its speed) creates quite a din while spinning.

Free to choose
The Veriton offers one more flexible feature, but it has a trade-off. When you first boot the system, you can install either Windows 2000 or Windows XP Professional. The Veriton loads your choice from an image on the hard drive. While IT departments are sure to appreciate the initial convenience, the extra time (roughly 10 to 15 minutes) needed to install the OS could hold up the deployment of multiple systems.

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Where to Buy

Acer Veriton 5200D (Pentium 4 1.7 GHz, 128 MB RAM, 40 GB HDD)

Part Number: 5200D-N1700B

MSRP: $856.00

See manufacturer website for availability.

Quick Specifications See All

  • Graphics Processor SiS 305
  • OS Provided Microsoft Windows 98 Second Edition
  • Video Memory 32 MB SDRAM
  • Color white
  • Monitor Type None.