2013 Infiniti G37 review: Still solid after all these years

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CNET Editors' Rating

3 stars Good
  • Overall: 6.7
  • Cabin tech: 7.0
  • Performance tech: 6.0
  • Design: 7.0

Average User Rating

4 stars 1 user review
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The Good With the Navigation package, the 2013 Infiniti G37 gains a very intuitive cabin tech interface. The automatic transmission's sport mode chooses gears well in response to gas pedal input.

The Bad The Sport package makes the ride a little rough at times. Average fuel economy dips a little low for an everyday driver.

The Bottom Line Due for an update, the 2013 Infiniti G37 relies on older tech under the hood and in the cabin, which might have been cutting-edge at launch but has become mostly average in the face of advances from the competition.

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Over the last decade, the Infiniti G model, as a premium sedan or coupe, became a decent competitor to the BMW 3 Series. I was impressed when Infiniti upped the power, going from the G35 to G37 model name, and always liked the solid cabin tech suite, which features one of the most intuitive interfaces in cardom.

The 2013 Infiniti G37 maintains all the attributes of prior generations, and not much more. It is essentially the same car as the first G37, which came out in 2007.

While the G37 stood still, its competition in the premium sedan market took a few odd turns. BMW broadened the appeal of the 3 Series , Audi's A6 made a technological leap, and Acura is giving its TL a serious update. Other competing cars, such as the Lexus IS and the Mercedes-Benz C-class , have remained relatively static.

The major advances passing the venerable G37 by have to do with improving drivetrain efficiency and bringing connected features into the cabin. That said, I still like the cabin tech suite in the G37, which comes as part of the optional Navigation package. It was cutting-edge in 2007 and retains its usefulness today.

Pushing buttons
Foremost is the interface, a crucial area that too many automakers get wrong. Infiniti mostly solves problems of usability by mixing a touch screen with buttons and a dial, making many operations controllable by either. For example, the G37 let me use its dial controller to scroll through menus, or push virtual buttons on the touch screen. Buttons below the touch screen give quick access to navigation, phone, and stereo. The dial controller, fitted with directional buttons, makes menu selection simple. The system responds quickly to inputs.

Voice command works for every area of the infotainment system, but shows a few limitations. Although you can place a call by saying the name of any contact stored in a Bluetooth-paired phone, the system isn't capable of recognizing artist, album, or song titles from iPods or flash drives plugged into the car's USB port. Entering an address for navigation requires saying each part of the address separately, a very tedious process, whereas competitive systems can parse complete address strings.

2013 Infiniti G37
The touch screen and big dial below it control cabin tech features, such as navigation and the stereo. Josh Miller/CNET

The navigation system, with maps stored on a hard drive, shows 2D and perspective views. It also shows some buildings rendered in 3D to serve as landmarks. The maps don't look as pretty as Audi's or BMW's, but they are clear and functional. Infiniti complements the navigation system with traffic data, shown on the maps and used to dynamically calculate routes. The points-of-interest database includes Zagat ratings for restaurants, helping drivers find good places to eat.

I found the navigation system's route guidance easy to follow, as it showed useful graphics to explain upcoming turns and also read out the name of each street. However, I had to look at the center LCD for any visual guidance, as Infiniti does not take advantage of the instrument cluster display for navigation, and there isn't a head-up display.

2013 Infiniti G37
You can view traffic data in a list or just let the navigation system help you avoid jams. Josh Miller/CNET

On-demand traffic and weather information comes to the car courtesy of SiriusXM Satellite Radio, instead of the cellular data channels coming into play among other automakers. That, of course, means the G37 has a satellite tuner, as well. Both the tuning knob and the touch screen work for finding stations, enhancing usability.

Ripping CDs
What now seems kind of old-school is the G37's Jukebox, space on the navigation hard drive reserved for music storage. I could have ripped CDs using the car's CD/DVD player to that hard drive, if I wanted to spend a couple of hours feeding CDs to the stereo.

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About The Author

Wayne Cunningham reviews cars and writes about automotive technology for CNET. Prior to the Car Tech beat, he covered spyware, Web building technologies, and computer hardware. He began covering technology and the Web in 1994 as an editor of The Net magazine. He's also the author of "Vaporware," a novel that's available as a Nook e-book.