2012 Lexus CT 200h review: 2012 Lexus CT 200h

Even if the CT 200h is a faux hot hatchback, it makes a case for comfortable practicality. Fuel economy is the first point in its favor. The hatchback design gives it a versatile interior. The roofline is a bit low, limiting the height of the cargo area, but the space has a lot of width, and the rear seats fold down easily, making for a flat load floor.

As the CT 200h model is only a year old, it gets the current generation of Lexus cabin electronics, with the most unusual feature being the mouse-style interface. A palm-fitting joystick molded into the center console moves a cursor around on the car's LCD, with haptic feedback that let me know when the cursor was over an onscreen icon. Pushing the Enter buttons on the sides of the controller worked like a mouse click.

The car's LCD, hinged on a motorized mount, sits in the top of the dashboard. This generation of Lexus gets a hard-drive-based navigation system with traffic data, downloaded over a satellite radio data feed, overlaid on the maps. The maps are strictly 2D, with no perspective option, but worked well for route guidance. The system read out street names for upcoming turns, but it could have been more aggressive about avoiding traffic jams.

The navigation system integrates with Lexus' Enform telematics service, so I could have found a destination on my computer and sent it to the car. Other connected features include weather, fuel prices, and stock quotes downloaded from satellite radio.


The CT 200h lets you check your stock portfolio while on the go.

This is pretty standard Lexus stuff these days, but more-advanced electronics have begun to roll out in Toyota-badged vehicles, such as the Prius v . Expect Lexus to get its own version of Toyota's Entune app integration sometime soon, but it will likely bypass the CT 200h until that model gets an update, which might not happen until 2014.

As such, the CT 200h doesn't offer Pandora or iHeartRadio, two streaming Internet music sources available in the Prius v. It does present a standard array of sources in a nice, tabbed interface, including Bluetooth audio streaming, iPod integration through a USB port, and satellite radio.

Lexus made an annoying design choice in putting the USB port under a little hatch on the center console. After just a little bit of use, I wanted to yank the hatch cover off, as it made plugging in an iPod cable or USB drive difficult. Worse, the position of the port meant my USB drive stuck up above the level of the controls, raising the possibility of the driver knocking it out of place while reaching for the drive mode control.

Other Lexus models get the option of a Mark Levinson audio system, which produces excellent sound. But Lexus seems to think the CT 200h, as an entry-level car, doesn't deserve that quality of stereo. Instead it gets a nonbranded 10-speaker system. I was not terribly impressed with the system's reproduction quality. Treble notes in some tracks sounded shrill, and its bass made no real impression.

In sum
Despite its looks, the 2012 Lexus CT 200h should not be mistaken for a sports car. Its hybrid drive system gives it excellent fuel economy, but the fact that the transmission does not let the driver work the revs limits the Lexus CT 200h where fast cornering and acceleration are concerned. Just consider it a really cool-looking hybrid. The F Sport package adds some nice cosmetic touches. Another point in favor of the car's design is the interface controller, which should be easy for anyone who has mastered a computer to use.

The CT 200h's cabin electronics fall short of the cutting edge. The navigation system works well and the audio system offers most of the sources one could want, but this stuff is all pretty standard these days. The standout feature in the cabin tech is the external data, such as gas prices and weather, brought in through satellite radio.

Tech specs
Model 2012 Lexus CT 200h
Trim Premium
Power train 1.8-liter gasoline-electric hybrid system, continuously variable transmission
EPA fuel economy 43 mpg city/40 mpg highway
Observed fuel economy 41 mpg
Navigation Optional hard-drive-based with traffic
Bluetooth phone support Standard, with contact list download
Disc player MP3-compatible six-CD changer
MP3 player support iPod integration
Other digital audio Bluetooth streaming, USB drive, auxiliary input, satellite radio
Audio system 10-speaker system
Driver aids Rearview camera
Base price $31,250
Price as tested $37,009

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  • Trim levels Premium
  • Body style Hatchback
  • Available Engine Gas
About The Author

Wayne Cunningham reviews cars and writes about automotive technology for CNET. Prior to the Car Tech beat, he covered spyware, Web building technologies, and computer hardware. He began covering technology and the Web in 1994 as an editor of The Net magazine. He's also the author of "Vaporware," a novel that's available as a Nook e-book.