2012 Ford Edge Limited review: 2012 Ford Edge Limited

But this is a new era for cars, in which dashboard software can be updated. Ford demonstrated an update to MyFord Touch late last year, which addresses touch-screen response times and the graphic layout. Owners of cars with the MyFord Touch system will be able to update the system themselves or bring it to a dealer.

The Edge Limited trim comes standard with Sync, which let me bypass the touch screen for music and phone functions. Using voice commands, I was able to request music playback by album, artist, or song name from a connected iPod. Likewise, the system indexed the contact list on my phone so I could use voice commands to call a specific name.

And despite the poor responsiveness of onscreen buttons, there are quite a few useful features in Ford's cabin tech suite. The navigation system, which comes stored on an SD card, shows easy-to-read maps and renders some buildings in 3D. The only gripe I had about this system is that it takes a few seconds to load when you first get into the car.


The navigation system's maps are easy to read, and can be switched between plan and perspective views.

Sirius Travel Link is also a part of this system, bringing in data feeds for everything from gas prices to stock quotes. These data feeds are integrated with the navigation system where applicable, so you can navigate right to the cheapest nearby gas, for example.

The stereo doesn't skimp on audio sources, either. There are two USB ports in the console, either of which can be used for a thumbdrive or cabled MP3 player. The system indexes any music libraries plugged into it using an onboard Gracenote database, so the onscreen interface can show album art when it is available.

The Sony audio system included in CNET's test car means more than extra speakers and a multichannel amp; it also changes the center instrument panel. A big, illuminated dial in the center not only handles volume, but has track skip and tuning buttons inset. The smooth plastic surface around it holds touch buttons for the stereo and climate controls. The whole control surface lends a futuristic touch to the car.

Sound quality from the stereo's 12 speakers is also quite good. It doesn't fall apart when the volume goes up and generally delivers an enjoyable listening experience. Demanding audiophiles will miss sharp bass response or glistening high notes, but most people will find it a good extension of the audio they enjoy from a home entertainment system.

Alluding to my brick comment from earlier, the Edge may not be nimble, but it drives better than masonry. From behind the wheel, it feels just about how it looks. The steering, with electric boost rather than hydraulic, offered the amount of resistance I would have expected. In parking lots and other low-speed conditions, it let me know I was doing some work, but I prefer that to an overboosted steering system.


Typically for this vehicle configuration, the cargo area can be extended by folding down the rear seats.

Similarly, the ride quality felt substantial, the car exhibiting a firmness that let me know it was traveling over bumps or whatever else the road had to throw at it. It was never uncomfortable, but certainly wasn't a luxuriously soft ride. That firmness helped it take turns in a settled fashion. Going around a cloverleaf, for example, the Edge showed little inclination to sway.

In sum
The 2012 Ford Edge is not much of a looker, but it is practical. The five-passengers-plus-cargo-space format is well-proven, and should suit many a family's needs. The big design flaw in the Edge is the MyFord Touch system, although Ford has a fix on the way.

Until the interface is fixed, it might be difficult to get maximum use out of the cabin electronics suite, which is a shame as it is full of useful features. The stereo has all the audio sources most people could want, and the navigation system can route around traffic. Sync remains a solid voice command and electronics integration system in the car.

A new star in the Ford heavens is the four-cylinder EcoBoost engine. It gives the Edge all the power it needs for running around town and taking the family camping. At the same time, it delivered fuel economy in the mid-20s, maybe not stellar compared with new economy cars but excellent for a vehicle with the Edge's capabilities.

Tech specs
Model 2012 Ford Edge
Trim Limited EcoBoost
Power train Turbocharged direct-injection 2-liter 4-cylinder engine, 6-speed automatic transmission
EPA fuel economy 21 mpg city/30 mpg highway
Observed fuel economy 25.2 mpg
Navigation Optional flash-memory-based with traffic data
Bluetooth phone support Standard
Disc player MP3-compatible single-CD
MP3 player support iPod, Zune, many others
Other digital audio USB drive, Bluetooth streaming, SD card, auxiliary input, satellite radio, HD Radio
Audio system Sony 12-speaker 390-watt 5.1-channel surround sound
Driver aids Blind spot detection, rearview camera
Base price $34,915
Price as tested $38,910

What you'll pay

Pricing is currently unavailable.

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Where to Buy

2012 Ford Edge Limited

Part Number: CNET101399426

MSRP: $34,935.00

See manufacturer website for availability.

Quick Specifications See All

  • Trim levels Limited
  • Body style SUV
  • Available Engine Gas