2010 Mercedes-Benz C350 review: 2010 Mercedes-Benz C350

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CNET Editors' Rating

3 stars Good
  • Overall: 6.4
  • Cabin tech: 7.0
  • Performance tech: 6.0
  • Design: 6.0

Average User Rating

2.5 stars 1 user review
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good The 2010 Mercedes-Benz C350's seven-speed transmission means decent freeway mileage, and a button toggles it between Comfort and Sport modes. A good navigation and audio system is available.

The Bad The optional iPod integration kit, when the navigation option is not chosen, has a terrible interface. The engine in the C350 doesn't provide a huge advantage over that of the C300.

The Bottom Line The 2010 Mercedes-Benz C350 is a comfortable driver with some sport aspirations, and cabin tech that can be decent or very bad, depending on the options.

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The Mercedes-Benz C-class, the lowest-end Mercedes-Benz sold in the U.S., underwent an upgrade in 2008 that modernized the car considerably, making it an excellent value in a semi-sporty small luxury sedan. We earlier reviewed, and praised, the C300 Sport and the C63 AMG . This is the first time we've seen the 2010 Mercedes-Benz C350.

But the C350 sent to us turned out to be an example of how not to option up a C-class. First of all, the need for the car's 3.5-liter V-6 seemed questionable, as the 3-liter V-6 in the C300 does a perfectly good job. Second, our car lacked the navigation system option, saddling it with what is probably the worst iPod integration we've seen. The car was equipped with an 18-inch AMG wheel package, money which could have been much better spent making the cabin electronics useful.

C350 versus C300
According to Mercedes-Benz specifications, the C350 gets you to 60 mph in 6.1 seconds, exactly 1 second faster than the C300. The 3.5-liter V-6 in the C350 produces 268 horsepower and 258 pound-feet of torque compared with the C300's 228 horsepower and 221 pound-feet of torque.


The seven-speed automatic transmission goes from Comfort to Sport mode at the push of a button.

Obviously, the C350 goes faster than the C300, but not by much. The sensation of acceleration is even less different, as the only transmission available for the C350 is a seven-speed automatic. Although Mercedes-Benz has done an excellent job of refining automatic transmissions to give a near-manual transmission feel, it still masks the engine performance behind torque converter softness.

The C300 can be had with that seven-speed automatic or a six-speed manual, the latter being more of a driving enthusiast's choice. In the C350, a button near the shifter toggles the mapping between Comfort and Sport settings, making the gear changes more aggressive. You can also manually change gears by moving the shifter from side-to-side, producing reasonably quick shifts. But we didn't find a huge performance gap between the C300 and C350.


3.5-liters of V-6 offers too little of an advantage over the C300's 3-liters.

Both C-class models use the same suspension, a four-wheel independent setup with stabilizer bars front and rear along with antidive control. In either model, it does a wonderful job of keeping the car composed during hard cornering. The 37 extra pound-feet of torque should make a difference accelerating out of a turn, but we didn't feel the C350 had a substantial edge.

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About The Author

Wayne Cunningham reviews cars and writes about automotive technology for CNET. Prior to the Car Tech beat, he covered spyware, Web building technologies, and computer hardware. He began covering technology and the Web in 1994 as an editor of The Net magazine. He's also the author of "Vaporware," a novel that's available as a Nook e-book.