2010 Lexus RX 350 review: 2010 Lexus RX 350


The new cabin tech controller works like a mouse, moving a cursor on the LCD.

At the front of the mount are buttons for the main menu and quick access to the navigation system map. We would also have liked quick access buttons for audio and phone systems. But we found it easy to quickly select menu items with the joystick--it's faster than even Infiniti's cabin controller, which has been our favorite for usability. The new Lexus controller delivers haptic feedback as you move its cursor over menu items, making it easy to use while paying attention to the road. And the amount of feedback can be adjusted.

The new navigation system stores its maps on a hard drive, although Lexus didn't do much to improve the maps themselves. The RX 350 offers only 2D maps, as opposed to the 3D maps becoming common with other automakers. The RX 350's maps show good resolution and are overlaid with traffic information, including traffic flow in red, amber, or green, and incidents. Although we had the navigation system set for dynamic routing around traffic incidents, we still had to go through about three menus to make it recalculate our route after it announced slow traffic on the road ahead. This part of the interface needs refining.


The navigation system includes traffic information, but routing around bad traffic is not intuitive.

Route guidance itself works well, with graphics to show upcoming turns and text-to-speech, where the system reads out the names of upcoming streets. One annoyance we had with this navigation system is that, when giving voice guidance, it didn't mute the stereo. We could barely hear the navigation instructions when playing music at moderate volume, and not at all when playing music loud.

The 2010 RX 350 offers most of the music sources we've come to expect from a modern system. Along with satellite radio, there is an MP3 compatible in-dash six-CD changer, a USB port that can also accept an iPod cable, an auxiliary input, and Bluetooth audio streaming. The only things it lacks are HD radio and the option to rip CDs to the navigation system's hard drive. The CD changer seemed very slow to read discs, but that might be more our perception when comparing it with the iPod access.

The Remote Touch controller does its job well for selecting music. USB drives and MP3 CDs are just shown in file and folder format, while iPod integration lets you select music by album, artist, and genre. Another annoyance: when viewing the song detail screen, to see which songs are playing on a satellite radio station, for example, the LCD automatically switched back to the map screen after about 30 seconds.


The Premium audio system, one step below the available Mark Levinson system, sounded very good.

Our RX 350 with the Premium audio system, included with the navigation option package, used 12 speakers, including a center channel and subwoofer. The audio quality was excellent with this system, delivering distinct highs and very legible midrange frequencies. The bass wasn't overly strong, but balanced well with the rest of the system. As another step up, a Mark Levinson system is available with the RX 350; it uses 15 speakers and replaces the CD changer with a DVD changer.

Although the audio system didn't mute for navigation guidance prompts, it did for the Bluetooth phone system. This system is the same one we saw in the IS 350 C, and it does everything we could ask. It paired easily to an iPhone and let us upload the phone's contact list to the car. Contacts were available on the LCD, using the Remote Touch controller, but, more conveniently, each contact can be dialed by name with the car's voice command system.

The voice command system is very capable in the RX 350, letting you enter addresses, dial numbers, and providing basic control over the audio system.

In sum
As a luxury vehicle, the 2010 Lexus RX 350 is successful, but will be quickly out of its element off-road, and won't perform well for the sport-minded. Most importantly, it's better than the previous generation, and doesn't try to be something it is not.

For performance tech, we like that Lexus went to a six-speed transmission, but direct injection on the engine might have added some efficiency. From that perspective, the RX 350 is fairly ordinary, but we do like the comfort level of the suspension. Cabin tech is nicely enhanced, and the new controller is particularly innovative. The phone system joins Ford and Kia in getting ahead of the curve, but the rest of the cabin tech is fairly standard stuff. Adaptive cruise control is also available, but wasn't present on our car. As for design, we had some issues with the interface on the LCD. The overall look of the car is very good, with nice, modern lines and smoothed sides. It does a good job of communicating Lexus style without looking outlandish.

Spec box
Model 2010 Lexus RX 350
Trim n/a
Power train 3.5-liter V-6
EPA fuel economy 18 mpg city/24 mpg highway
Observed fuel economy 20.2 mpg
Navigation Hard-drive-based with traffic
Bluetooth phone support Standard
Disc player MP3-compatible six-CD changer
MP3 player support iPod integration
Other digital audio Bluetooth streaming audio, USB drive, auxiliary input, satellite radio
Audio system Premium 12-speaker system
Driver aids Sonar parking sensors, rear-view camera
Base price $38,200
Price as tested $47,825

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    2010 Lexus RX 350

    Part Number: 101146807
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    • Body style SUV
    • Available Engine Gas