2010 Honda Pilot Touring review: 2010 Honda Pilot Touring

This engine tech only partially succeeds. Honda earns a ULEV II rating for emissions from the California Air Resources Board, an excellent achievement for a big SUV like the Pilot. Although EPA fuel economy figures are 16 mpg in the city and 22 mpg on the highway, during our driving it averaged only 15.6 mpg, with much of our time spent at freeway speeds of 70 to 80 mph.

The failure to hit that EPA range is largely because of higher speeds than the EPA's highway test cycle. With a sixth gear in the Pilot's transmission, it would do better on modern freeways, not requiring the engine to work as much. Likewise, Honda hasn't yet gone to direct injection, which could further improve its fuel economy.

The 2010 Pilot tries to train its drivers to be more eco-friendly with a little green Eco label that lights up on the instrument panel when you drive in a more fuel efficient manner. We generally saw it light up when coasting--just about any application of throttle turned it right back off.


With all-wheel-drive, the Pilot is set for light off-roading.

For a big SUV, the Pilot has a very un-truck-like suspension. It uses MacPherson struts in front and a multilink suspension in the rear, leading to a decent ride and accurate handling. As with most big vehicles like the Pilot, the steering is a little dead in the center, making for less work on long, straight highways. And, of course, it's no sports car--we weren't inclined to see how much it would tip in the corners. Our version also came with an all-wheel-drive system, activated by a button near the shifter. Honda calls it variable torque management, as it moves power around to the wheels that need it most.

Surprised by sound quality
For safety on the road, Honda includes its Bluetooth hands-free phone system with the 2010 Pilot Touring model. We've seen this phone system before in other Honda models. It handles the basics, but isn't very advanced. It doesn't make use of the car's LCD, which does show navigation and audio information. Instead, if you tell it to make a call, the phone number shows up on a monochrome screen on the instrument panel.

With the rear-seat entertainment system present, the six-disc changer on the stack is accompanied by a DVD player, along with controls to power up the rear-ceiling-mounted screen. One particularly nice feature with the rear entertainment system is that back seat passengers can listen to a different audio source, or use the RCA and composite jacks on the back of the console to plug in MP3 and video players.


The rear-seat entertainment system can be used for music or video.

Honda is generous with the audio sources, and the interface makes selecting music easy. The six-disc changer reads MP3 CDs, allowing for an abundance of music. There is also satellite radio, but the most useful feature we found is the USB port in the console. It reads MP3s off of USB drives, or will handle an iPod cable. With an iPod plugged into the system, the onscreen interface shows lists of artists, albums, tracks, and genres.

Having the rear-seat entertainment system gave us an unexpected bonus--a beefed-up audio system delivering excellent sound quality. This system uses 10 speakers, as opposed to the standard 7, and 512 watts of amplification. Along with door speakers and tweeters in the dashboard, it also gets a center channel, subwoofer, and two speakers mounted on the rear pillars, facing into the cabin for a surround effect. We found the sound quality surprisingly good, with distinct notes throughout the frequency range. Bass is very solid, yet doesn't overwhelm the other frequencies.

In sum
The 2010 Honda Pilot Touring is one of the most tech-filled cars wearing the Honda badge, but that's not saying too much. The cabin tech, while very useful, falls short of what can be had in Honda's Acura brand. The two stand-out features were the iPod integration and the audio system, which owes its extra power and speakers to the rear entertainment system. On the performance side, we appreciate Honda's engineering, and the efficiency technologies used in the engine. But in real-world driving, the fuel economy just isn't that good. The smooth operation of the power train is a point in its favor. The interface design for the cabin electronics is problematic, as it has been in Acura models. Too many buttons show the need for simplification.

Spec box
Model 2010 Honda Pilot
Trim Touring AWD with navigation and rear seat entertainment
Powertrain 3.5-liter V-6
EPA fuel economy 16 mpg city/22 mpg highway
Observed fuel economy 15.6 mpg
Navigation DVD-based
Bluetooth phone support Standard
Disc player Six CD changer with MP3 support, DVD player
MP3 player support iPod integration
Other digital audio Satellite radio, USB drive
Audio system 10 speaker, 512 watts
Driver aids Rearview camera, sonar object detection
Base price $40,245
Price as tested $40,955

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    2010 Honda Pilot Touring

    Part Number: 101172638
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    • Body style SUV
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