2010 Acura ZDX review: 2010 Acura ZDX

A Bluetooth phone system rounds out the cabin tech suite. It offers all the features we would expect from a high-tech car, such as importing a paired phone's contact list and showing recent calls on the LCD. But it doesn't let you dial contacts by name with voice command, a feature becoming more common with competitors.

The ZDX and MDX also drive similarly, both getting an adaptive suspension with comfort and sport modes, and Acura's Super Handling All Wheel Drive (SH-AWD). The combination of these two suspension technologies makes the bulky ZDX rotate nicely during hard cornering.

As we tested the ZDX on mountain roads, powering through corners at speeds you wouldn't normally take a vehicle that sits up high like an SUV, the active suspension pushed back against body roll, keeping the car relatively flat. At the same time, SH-AWD transferred torque across the rear axle, sending more power to the outside wheel to help push the car around the turn.

The weak link for this type of driving in the ZDX, and the MDX, is the power train. The ZDX uses a 3.7-liter V-6 with Acura's variable valve timing technology, putting its output at 300 horsepower and 270 pound-feet of torque. That engine made a delightful sound when we punched the gas, but technically it is pretty average for this segment. BMW's X6 , with a turbocharged 3-liter straight six, gets substantially more torque.


A dial in front of the shifter switches the suspension between Sport and Comfort modes.

Likewise, the six-speed automatic transmission in the ZDX doesn't go above and beyond. It is a perfectly fine transmission for trundling around cities and rolling down the freeway, but it didn't snap crisply from gear to gear as we threw the car into the turns. It features both Sport and manual shift modes, but the former isn't particularly aggressive, merely keeping the engine speed above 3,000rpm. For manual mode shifting, there are paddles on the steering wheel, but we could mentally track the time between paddle pull and gear change.

Maneuvering on city streets, the steering radius proved adequate for some fairly tight U-turns. But the dimensions of the vehicle, with its wide sides and long nose, make it difficult to judge the space around it. The ZDX has a backup camera, an essential feature on this car, with two different views and static distance lines. But sideview cameras would also be useful.


The rearview camera shows distance lines, and can be switched between two different views.

The suspension's Comfort mode isn't all that comfortable. It gives the suspension longer travel and a soft feeling, but doesn't let the ZDX ride over potholes unruffled. That long suspension travel also leads to up and down oscillation on the freeway. We generally preferred leaving the suspension in Sport mode.

Those little critiques aside, the ZDX feels solid, with the luxurious cabin and easy driving character make it a comfortable road trip car. EPA fuel economy is 16 mpg city and 23 mpg highway, making it a car you might want to reserve for longer trips, as opposed to errands around town. In our driving, we just eked out 18.2 mpg, which felt a little low.

The ZDX has a few tech tricks that help it out on the freeway. The Advance trim version comes with adaptive cruise control, which matches speed with slower traffic ahead. We cruised for miles and miles without touching gas pedal or brake.

The radar for the adaptive cruise control also enables the Collision Mitigation Braking System, which, when sensing an impending crash, pretensions the seatbelts and applies the brakes. A few times, as we closed in on slow traffic ahead, this system flashed a sign on the instrument cluster warning us to brake.

Blind-spot detection in the vehicle lights up icons in the A pillars alerting you to traffic in the lane next to the ZDX. This system has a narrow field of detection, only lighting up when other cars are almost out of view of the sideview mirror.

In sum
We ended up liking the unique look of the 2010 Acura ZDX, but didn't find it all that practical, as rear seat access and the cargo area is compromised by the sloping roof. The interior styling is very good, giving the ZDX the kind of luxury feel that past Acuras have lacked. The cabin tech interface design also contributes to its design score, as we found it quite easy to access different car functions. We also appreciate that Acura has reduced the number of buttons on the dashboard from some more extreme quantities on other models.

The drivetrain was merely average; we've seen countless V-6es mated to six-speed automatics, and the performance numbers are not exceptional. But the cornering abilities boost the ZDX's performance tech score.

It achieves an excellent score for cabin tech, too. Although the maps for the navigation system could be better, there were a lot of features we liked. The stereo, with its voice command iPod integration, helps raise the score significantly. And driver aid features also give it a boost.

Spec box
Model 2010 Acura ZDX
Trim Advance
Power train 3.7-liter V-6
EPA fuel economy 16 mpg city/23 mpg highway
Observed fuel economy 18.2 mpg
Navigation Hard-drive-based with traffic
Bluetooth phone support Standard
Disc player MP3 compatible single DVD/CD player
MP3 player support iPod integration
Other digital audio 15GB onboard hard drive, USB drive, Bluetooth audio, Sirius Satellite Radio
Audio system ELS 10 speaker 435 watt system
Driver aids Adaptive cruise control, blind-spot warning, rearview camera
Base price $56,045
Price as tested $56,905

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    2010 Acura ZDX

    Part Number: 101162013
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    • Body style SUV
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