2008 Volkswagen R32 review: 2008 Volkswagen R32

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CNET Editors' Rating

3.5 stars Very good
  • Overall: 7.3
  • Cabin tech: 4.0
  • Performance tech: 9.0
  • Design: 10.0
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good The 2008 Volkswagen R32 delivers more power and better handling than you would expect from a hot hatchback, and it is a fine-looking car.

The Bad iPod integration is a hack, using the stereo's CD changer port, and so not able to show song information. Worse, iPod integration, included with the subpar navigation system, takes away the six-disc changer.

The Bottom Line The poor cabin electronics in the 2008 Volkswagen R32 keep it from being a great tech car, but its drivetrain tech makes up somewhat for that lost ground. However, there are many good sport sedans that come in around the same price.

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Hot hatchback aficionados dream of a car like the 2008 Volkswagen R32. Where most hot hatchbacks, such as the 2007 Honda Civic Si, use front-wheel drive and a four-cylinder engine, the R32 upgrades those specs with all-wheel drive and a 3.2-liter V-6, giving it exceptional handling and power that doesn't fade at high speed. And the look of the R32 is about as refined as a hatchback can be.

But the real draw of a hot hatchback is its affordability coupled with practicality. They make good starter cars for the driving enthusiast who also needs to use them as daily drivers. The R32 meets the latter requirement while pushing the envelope on the former. Although it competes in a pricier echelon, its cabin electronics fall far short, with a slow navigation system and a truly bizarre stereo setup.

Test the tech: The hottest hatchback
The 2008 Volkswagen R32 is a car you can use to pick up groceries or spend a day sport driving along mountain roads. We decided to do both. For our test, we packed a grocery bag with carbonated beverages, a few cans of Coke and some fizzy water, and put it in back of the R32. Then we thrashed the car along one of our favorite sports car test roads, a run that includes uneven pavement and hairpin turns. Our usual harrowing drive would include the added danger of beverages exploding all over the cargo area of the car.

The R32 comes with Volkswagen's DSG transmission, a dual-clutch manual that operates the clutch for you. Before we headed down our mountain run, we switched the car into manual mode, as we would want to take full advantage of this transmission. The DSG can do the shifting for you, and even has a pretty good Sport mode that does a decent job of holding gears, but in manual mode you get lightning fast shifts when you flick the steering-wheel-mounted paddles.

2008 Volkswagen R32
With its hatchback, the Volkswagen R32 is ready to haul groceries and be thrown into the curves.

We jammed the R32 down the chute, a narrow road running along a hillside covered in tall redwood trees, in third gear, downshifting to second with a touch of the left paddle as we approached our first turn. Coming in from the outside, we dove into this 90 degree twist, shoving the throttle down to bolt the car out the other side. With the R32's all-wheel-drive, we had grip all the way through, without any sign of wheel slippage. We pointed the car and it followed, its engine making a satisfying growl as the revs climbed in second gear. But we expected no less, as the R32's 4Motion all-wheel-drive system is based on the same Haldex limited slip coupling as the Quattro system we've also tried on the Audi TT and the Audi S5.

As we got more comfortable with the car and the road, we pushed it a little harder, trying it out on a good hairpin where we had visibility all through the turn and down the road a fair distance. Again, the car wouldn't slip, and its sway bar kept body roll to a minimum. But this road also has many small dips and rises, making the car jounce up and down on what felt like a too soft suspension. On one of these jounces we also felt some hard braking from the front-left wheel as the stability program stepped in, not that we were in any danger of tipping.

We took our road's many twists and turns in second and third gear, enjoying the shifts and the grip of the car, then added some extra miles on a fun side road that went in the right direction. At the end, we pulled off the highway and had a look under the hatch. Amazingly, our grocery bag was still upright, although on the opposite side from where we had initially placed it. Of course, our bottles and cans were all tipped over, but when we popped open one of the Cokes, we got minimal spray. The car proved a stable platform, its all-wheel-drive preventing the rear end from violently sliding around.

In the cabin
Although the 2008 Volkswagen R32 surprised us with its stability on our tech test, its cabin gadgets didn't exactly pass muster. Our car came equipped with a navigation system and iPod integration for the stereo, something we are always eager to test out. Bluetooth cell phone integration isn't available on the R32.

2008 Volkswagen R32
The Volkswagen R32's onscreen interface for iPod integration doesn't provide much information.

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Where to Buy

2008 Volkswagen R32

Part Number: 100895778 Released: Nov. 12, 2007
Pricing is currently unavailable.

Quick Specifications See All

  • Release date Nov. 12, 2007
  • Trim levels Base
  • Body style Hatchback
  • Available Engine Gas